Long-Term Effects of High-Protein Diets on Renal Function

Long-Term Effects of High-Protein Diets on Renal Function Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a prevalence of approximately 13 and is most frequently caused by diabetes and hypertension. In population studies, CKD etiology is often uncertain. Some experimental and observational human studies have suggested that high-protein intake may increase CKD progression and even cause CKD in healthy people. The protein source may be important. Daily red meat consumption over years may increase CKD risk, whereas white meat and dairy proteins appear to have no such effect, and fruit and vegetable proteins may be renal protective. Few randomized trials exist with an observation time greater than 6 months, and most of these were conducted in patients with preexisting diseases that dispose to CKD. Results conflict and do not allow any conclusion about kidney-damaging effects of long-term, high-protein intake. Until additional data become available, present knowledge seems to substantiate a concern. Screening for CKD should be considered before and during long-term, high-protein intake. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Nutrition Annual Reviews

Long-Term Effects of High-Protein Diets on Renal Function

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0199-9885
eISSN
1545-4312
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev-nutr-071714-034426
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has a prevalence of approximately 13 and is most frequently caused by diabetes and hypertension. In population studies, CKD etiology is often uncertain. Some experimental and observational human studies have suggested that high-protein intake may increase CKD progression and even cause CKD in healthy people. The protein source may be important. Daily red meat consumption over years may increase CKD risk, whereas white meat and dairy proteins appear to have no such effect, and fruit and vegetable proteins may be renal protective. Few randomized trials exist with an observation time greater than 6 months, and most of these were conducted in patients with preexisting diseases that dispose to CKD. Results conflict and do not allow any conclusion about kidney-damaging effects of long-term, high-protein intake. Until additional data become available, present knowledge seems to substantiate a concern. Screening for CKD should be considered before and during long-term, high-protein intake.

Journal

Annual Review of NutritionAnnual Reviews

Published: Aug 21, 2017

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