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Interplay Between Innate Immunity and the Plant Microbiota

Interplay Between Innate Immunity and the Plant Microbiota The innate immune system of plants recognizes microbial pathogens and terminates their growth. However, recent findings suggest that at least one layer of this system is also engaged in cooperative plant-microbe interactions and influences host colonization by beneficial microbial communities. This immune layer involves sensing of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that initiate quantitative immune responses to control host-microbial load, whereas diversification of MAMPs and PRRs emerges as a mechanism that locally sculpts microbial assemblages in plant populations. This suggests a more complex microbial management role of the innate immune system for controlled accommodation of beneficial microbes and in pathogen elimination. The finding that similar molecular strategies are deployed by symbionts and pathogens to dampen immune responses is consistent with this hypothesis but implies different selective pressures on the immune system due to contrasting outcomes on plant fitness. The reciprocal interplay between microbiota and the immune system likely plays a critical role in shaping beneficial plant-microbiota combinations and maintaining microbial homeostasis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Phytopathology Annual Reviews

Interplay Between Innate Immunity and the Plant Microbiota

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References (165)

Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0066-4286
eISSN
1545-2107
DOI
10.1146/annurev-phyto-080516-035623
pmid
28645232
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The innate immune system of plants recognizes microbial pathogens and terminates their growth. However, recent findings suggest that at least one layer of this system is also engaged in cooperative plant-microbe interactions and influences host colonization by beneficial microbial communities. This immune layer involves sensing of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that initiate quantitative immune responses to control host-microbial load, whereas diversification of MAMPs and PRRs emerges as a mechanism that locally sculpts microbial assemblages in plant populations. This suggests a more complex microbial management role of the innate immune system for controlled accommodation of beneficial microbes and in pathogen elimination. The finding that similar molecular strategies are deployed by symbionts and pathogens to dampen immune responses is consistent with this hypothesis but implies different selective pressures on the immune system due to contrasting outcomes on plant fitness. The reciprocal interplay between microbiota and the immune system likely plays a critical role in shaping beneficial plant-microbiota combinations and maintaining microbial homeostasis.

Journal

Annual Review of PhytopathologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Aug 4, 2017

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