Forming Planets via Pebble Accretion

Forming Planets via Pebble Accretion The detection and characterization of large populations of pebbles in protoplanetary disks have motivated the study of pebble accretion as a driver of planetary growth. This review covers all aspects of planet formation by pebble accretion, from dust growth over planetesimal formation to the accretion of protoplanets and fully grown planets with gaseous envelopes. Pebbles are accreted at a very high rateorders of magnitude higher than planetesimal accretionand the rate decreases only slowly with distance from the central star. This allows planetary cores to start their growth in much more distant positions than their final orbits. The giant planets orbiting our Sun and other stars, including systems of wide-orbit exoplanets, can therefore be formed in complete consistency with planetary migration. We demonstrate how growth tracks of planetary mass versus semimajor axis can be obtained for all the major classes of planets by integrating a relatively simple set of governing equations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences Annual Reviews

Forming Planets via Pebble Accretion

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0084-6597
eISSN
1545-4495
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev-earth-063016-020226
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The detection and characterization of large populations of pebbles in protoplanetary disks have motivated the study of pebble accretion as a driver of planetary growth. This review covers all aspects of planet formation by pebble accretion, from dust growth over planetesimal formation to the accretion of protoplanets and fully grown planets with gaseous envelopes. Pebbles are accreted at a very high rateorders of magnitude higher than planetesimal accretionand the rate decreases only slowly with distance from the central star. This allows planetary cores to start their growth in much more distant positions than their final orbits. The giant planets orbiting our Sun and other stars, including systems of wide-orbit exoplanets, can therefore be formed in complete consistency with planetary migration. We demonstrate how growth tracks of planetary mass versus semimajor axis can be obtained for all the major classes of planets by integrating a relatively simple set of governing equations.

Journal

Annual Review of Earth and Planetary SciencesAnnual Reviews

Published: Aug 30, 2017

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