Water Transport in and to Roots

Water Transport in and to Roots Plants will not grow unless they are supplied with enough water, in the face of continuing evaporation from their leaves, to maintain those leaves well hydrated. In what follows I review some of the processes that influence the ability of roots to supply leaves with adequate amounts of water, including flow within the roots and flow to them through the soil they occupy. I leave undefined the precise meaning of "well hydrated," for the influence of the water status of its leaves on the performance of a plant is currently con­ troversial (66, 67, 69,80); but the gross meaning is clear: Wilted plants do not grow. This review is essentially an expansion and extension of part of Boyer's (4) recent comprehensive coverage of water transport in plants. Other recent 0066-4294/88/0601-0245$02.00 PASSIQURA reviews (5, 79) and books (37, 75, 81) provide further background. In the world outside the laboratory, the collection of water by roots depends as much on their interactions with the soil-their growth despite mechanical hin­ drance, their preferential occupation of continuous large pores in the soil, their ability to maintain hydraulic continuity with the soil-as on the pro­ cesses that influence transport within the root. Accordingly, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Water Transport in and to Roots

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 39 (1) – Jun 1, 1988

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1988 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.pp.39.060188.001333
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Plants will not grow unless they are supplied with enough water, in the face of continuing evaporation from their leaves, to maintain those leaves well hydrated. In what follows I review some of the processes that influence the ability of roots to supply leaves with adequate amounts of water, including flow within the roots and flow to them through the soil they occupy. I leave undefined the precise meaning of "well hydrated," for the influence of the water status of its leaves on the performance of a plant is currently con­ troversial (66, 67, 69,80); but the gross meaning is clear: Wilted plants do not grow. This review is essentially an expansion and extension of part of Boyer's (4) recent comprehensive coverage of water transport in plants. Other recent 0066-4294/88/0601-0245$02.00 PASSIQURA reviews (5, 79) and books (37, 75, 81) provide further background. In the world outside the laboratory, the collection of water by roots depends as much on their interactions with the soil-their growth despite mechanical hin­ drance, their preferential occupation of continuous large pores in the soil, their ability to maintain hydraulic continuity with the soil-as on the pro­ cesses that influence transport within the root. Accordingly,

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1988

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