Visual Sensitivity and Parallel Retinocortical Channels

Visual Sensitivity and Parallel Retinocortical Channels Visual Sensitivity and Neural Mechanisms There has been some excitement lately in relating psychophysical properties of visual sensitivity to neural mechanisms in the retina and in cerebral cortex . Parallel processing of visual information by the P and M retinocortical pathways has been a major focus of this interest. Visual psychophysicists and neuroscientists have devoted enthusiastic attention to each other's results. In this review I summarize the major psychophysical and neurophysiological findings on the role of P and M pathways that may allow a unified explanation for visual sensitivity , and also analyze several proposed hypotheses. 0066-4308/90/0201-0635$02.00 SHAPLEY The focus of interest is the degree to which color vision and achromatic vision may be thought of as parallel and independent sensory analyses of the visual scene. Theories of color vision have traditionally considered responses to black and white as the result of a neural mechanism different from those (the color-opponent neurons) that can discriminate among wavelengths or wavelength distributions (see , for example, Hurvich & Jameson 1957). This dualistic approach was reinforced by the neurophysiological work of De Valois and of Gouras and their colleagues in an earlier era of visual neurophysiology (reviewed in De Valois & De http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Psychology Annual Reviews

Visual Sensitivity and Parallel Retinocortical Channels

Annual Review of Psychology, Volume 41 (1) – Feb 1, 1990

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1990 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4308
eISSN
1545-2085
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ps.41.020190.003223
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Visual Sensitivity and Neural Mechanisms There has been some excitement lately in relating psychophysical properties of visual sensitivity to neural mechanisms in the retina and in cerebral cortex . Parallel processing of visual information by the P and M retinocortical pathways has been a major focus of this interest. Visual psychophysicists and neuroscientists have devoted enthusiastic attention to each other's results. In this review I summarize the major psychophysical and neurophysiological findings on the role of P and M pathways that may allow a unified explanation for visual sensitivity , and also analyze several proposed hypotheses. 0066-4308/90/0201-0635$02.00 SHAPLEY The focus of interest is the degree to which color vision and achromatic vision may be thought of as parallel and independent sensory analyses of the visual scene. Theories of color vision have traditionally considered responses to black and white as the result of a neural mechanism different from those (the color-opponent neurons) that can discriminate among wavelengths or wavelength distributions (see , for example, Hurvich & Jameson 1957). This dualistic approach was reinforced by the neurophysiological work of De Valois and of Gouras and their colleagues in an earlier era of visual neurophysiology (reviewed in De Valois & De

Journal

Annual Review of PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1990

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