Visual-Motor Function of the Primate Superior Colliculus

Visual-Motor Function of the Primate Superior Colliculus One of the major functions of the brain, and probably the original function of all nervous systems, is to produce movement in response to sensory stimulation. In recent years one case of such sensory-motor function, the visual initiation of eye movements, has been studied extensively. Much of this work has centered on the most obvious candidate for visual-motor guidance, the superior colliculus. There has long not been any doubt that the superior colliculus is involved in vision and eye movement-the struc­ ture receives direct projections from the retina and over a century ago stimulation of the collicuius was shown to produce eye movements (Ada­ mlik 1870). But it has only recently been possible to study the relation of single cell activity within this structure to both movement and vision. This cellular approach, along with new anatomical, physiological, and behavioral methods, has enabled the investigation of the machinery whereby the visual stimulus initiates motor movement. It is these advances that we concentrate on in this review. We emphasize the primate superior colliculus because most of the work relating to movement has been done in the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. At the same time we draw on work done on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Reviews

Visual-Motor Function of the Primate Superior Colliculus

Annual Review of Neuroscience, Volume 3 (1) – Mar 1, 1980

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/visual-motor-function-of-the-primate-superior-colliculus-UxiB0lzvod
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0147-006X
eISSN
1545-4126
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ne.03.030180.001201
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the major functions of the brain, and probably the original function of all nervous systems, is to produce movement in response to sensory stimulation. In recent years one case of such sensory-motor function, the visual initiation of eye movements, has been studied extensively. Much of this work has centered on the most obvious candidate for visual-motor guidance, the superior colliculus. There has long not been any doubt that the superior colliculus is involved in vision and eye movement-the struc­ ture receives direct projections from the retina and over a century ago stimulation of the collicuius was shown to produce eye movements (Ada­ mlik 1870). But it has only recently been possible to study the relation of single cell activity within this structure to both movement and vision. This cellular approach, along with new anatomical, physiological, and behavioral methods, has enabled the investigation of the machinery whereby the visual stimulus initiates motor movement. It is these advances that we concentrate on in this review. We emphasize the primate superior colliculus because most of the work relating to movement has been done in the rhesus monkey, Macaca mulatta. At the same time we draw on work done on

Journal

Annual Review of NeuroscienceAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 1, 1980

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off