The Thermodynamic Stability of Proteins

The Thermodynamic Stability of Proteins PERSPECTIVES AND OVERVIEW For a physical chemist there is probably nothing more fascinating in the realm of biology than the spontaneous formation of complex, detailed molecular structures and higher-order biological complexes. Proteins have a role in a large fraction of self-assembling systems. Initially they fold spontaneously to form three-dimensional structures based on the self rec­ ognition of their own sequences; thereafter they have the capacity to interact with other proteins (or other types of molecules) to form complexes or higher-order structures. One of the key problems in molecular biology today is to understand the physical forces and mechanistic pathways that lead to folded proteins and to the great variety of subcellular assemblies that have been discovered in living systems. Studies of the basic process of the folding of a polypeptide chain into a specific three-dimensional, native structure are probably destined to be central to our understanding not only of assembly processes but of bio­ logical interactions in general. This is not because proteins belong to a class of special importance, but because so much quantitative information 115 0883-9182/87/0610--0115$02.00 SCHELLMAN is. available to test mechanistic ideas. Protein folding is clearly defined and is. easily produced in the laboratory for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Reviews

The Thermodynamic Stability of Proteins

Annual Review of Biophysics, Volume 16 (1) – Jun 1, 1987

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/the-thermodynamic-stability-of-proteins-LoVqiQBRSG
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1936-122X
eISSN
1936-1238
DOI
10.1146/annurev.bb.16.060187.000555
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PERSPECTIVES AND OVERVIEW For a physical chemist there is probably nothing more fascinating in the realm of biology than the spontaneous formation of complex, detailed molecular structures and higher-order biological complexes. Proteins have a role in a large fraction of self-assembling systems. Initially they fold spontaneously to form three-dimensional structures based on the self rec­ ognition of their own sequences; thereafter they have the capacity to interact with other proteins (or other types of molecules) to form complexes or higher-order structures. One of the key problems in molecular biology today is to understand the physical forces and mechanistic pathways that lead to folded proteins and to the great variety of subcellular assemblies that have been discovered in living systems. Studies of the basic process of the folding of a polypeptide chain into a specific three-dimensional, native structure are probably destined to be central to our understanding not only of assembly processes but of bio­ logical interactions in general. This is not because proteins belong to a class of special importance, but because so much quantitative information 115 0883-9182/87/0610--0115$02.00 SCHELLMAN is. available to test mechanistic ideas. Protein folding is clearly defined and is. easily produced in the laboratory for

Journal

Annual Review of BiophysicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1987

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off