The Roles of Heat Shock Proteins in Plants

The Roles of Heat Shock Proteins in Plants Environmental conditions that change temperature, light environment, water status, or hormone balance lead to altered gene expression in plants. At the molecular level, one of the best-characterized environmental responses is the response to high temperature or heat shock. Ten years ago it was shown that when seedlings are shifted to temperatures five or more degrees above optimal growing temperatures, synthesis of most normal proteins and mRNAs is repressed, and transcription and translation of a small set of "heat shock proteins" (HSPs) is initiated (7, 88, 118, 121 , 127 for review). The heat shock response is not unique to plants. It was first discovered in Drosophila in the 1960s and has been described in a wide range of organisms including Es­ cherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and humans (loa, 115, 126). A comparison of the response in different organisms has shown that it is highly conserved in two important ways: (a) the molecular mechanism of gene induction by heat shows many similarities among diverse eukaryotes; and (b) the major HSPs are highly homologous among eukaryotes, and in several cases, homologous proteins have been identified in prokaryotes as well. The evolutionary conservation of the heat shock response argues strongly that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

The Roles of Heat Shock Proteins in Plants

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 42 (1) – Jun 1, 1991

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.pp.42.060191.003051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environmental conditions that change temperature, light environment, water status, or hormone balance lead to altered gene expression in plants. At the molecular level, one of the best-characterized environmental responses is the response to high temperature or heat shock. Ten years ago it was shown that when seedlings are shifted to temperatures five or more degrees above optimal growing temperatures, synthesis of most normal proteins and mRNAs is repressed, and transcription and translation of a small set of "heat shock proteins" (HSPs) is initiated (7, 88, 118, 121 , 127 for review). The heat shock response is not unique to plants. It was first discovered in Drosophila in the 1960s and has been described in a wide range of organisms including Es­ cherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and humans (loa, 115, 126). A comparison of the response in different organisms has shown that it is highly conserved in two important ways: (a) the molecular mechanism of gene induction by heat shows many similarities among diverse eukaryotes; and (b) the major HSPs are highly homologous among eukaryotes, and in several cases, homologous proteins have been identified in prokaryotes as well. The evolutionary conservation of the heat shock response argues strongly that

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1991

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