The Potential for Application of Individual-Based Simulation Models for Assessing the Effects of Global Change*

The Potential for Application of Individual-Based Simulation Models for Assessing the Effects of... The environmental changes that could result from human actIvitIes are sufficiently large to be characterized as an "uncontrolled global experiment" (7). The obvious lack of experimental control when complex changes are global in scale, along with a myriad of other logistic difficulties, confound the evaluation of global consequences. This has created a need for reasoned extrapolations from experimental and observational data and the application of computer models to predict the ecological response of the terrestrial surface to changes in the environment. The first model-based evaluations of global changes for terrestrial vegetation focused on identifying which phenomena need to be considered and at what (88, 33). Then the emphasis on plant physiology (22, 27, 4 1 , 7 1, 72, 1 18) versus the emphasis on individual­ plant natural history and demography (34, 43, 44, 55, 56, 76, 121) formed temporal and spatial scales and biophysics *The US government has the right to retain a nonexclusive. roya l ty free license in and to any - copyright covering this paper. SHUGART, SMITH & POST an important dichotomy for the models simulating the vegetation dynamics in response to environmental change. This dichotomy has blurred as a new generation of models http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

The Potential for Application of Individual-Based Simulation Models for Assessing the Effects of Global Change*

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1992 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
DOI
10.1146/annurev.es.23.110192.000311
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The environmental changes that could result from human actIvitIes are sufficiently large to be characterized as an "uncontrolled global experiment" (7). The obvious lack of experimental control when complex changes are global in scale, along with a myriad of other logistic difficulties, confound the evaluation of global consequences. This has created a need for reasoned extrapolations from experimental and observational data and the application of computer models to predict the ecological response of the terrestrial surface to changes in the environment. The first model-based evaluations of global changes for terrestrial vegetation focused on identifying which phenomena need to be considered and at what (88, 33). Then the emphasis on plant physiology (22, 27, 4 1 , 7 1, 72, 1 18) versus the emphasis on individual­ plant natural history and demography (34, 43, 44, 55, 56, 76, 121) formed temporal and spatial scales and biophysics *The US government has the right to retain a nonexclusive. roya l ty free license in and to any - copyright covering this paper. SHUGART, SMITH & POST an important dichotomy for the models simulating the vegetation dynamics in response to environmental change. This dichotomy has blurred as a new generation of models

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1992

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