The Nearly Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution

The Nearly Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution For a long time the study of evolution has been based on morphology;the long neckof a giraffe, the human brain, a bird’s wing, and so on. Morphological changein evolution is explained by Darwin’stheory of natural selection, but this theory is largely qualitative rather than quantitative. Populationgenetics started morethan half a century ago as an attempt to understandevolutionary changequantitatively. Becauseevolution must take place in all individuals of a species, the changeof gene frequencyin the population has been analyzed. However, long as the facts of evolution are based on morphologicaltraits, so evolutionary change is very difficult to connect with gene frequency change except in relatively few circumstances. The remarkableprogress of molecularbiology has madeit possible to apply population genetics theory to real data. Wenowknow that genetic information is stored in linear sequences of DNA which are stably transmitted from generation to generation, and we can comparethe linear sequences of DNA and aminoacids among species. It is also possible to comparesecondary and tertiary structures of proteins and nucleic acids fromvarious sources. Becauseof such progress, someaspects of traditional neo-Darwinism are beginningto need revision. The first step in such a revision is the neutral mutation-random drift hypothesis put forward by Kimura(47) in 1968. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

The Nearly Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/the-nearly-neutral-theory-of-molecular-evolution-ihN0kAifaE
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1992 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.es.23.110192.001403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

For a long time the study of evolution has been based on morphology;the long neckof a giraffe, the human brain, a bird’s wing, and so on. Morphological changein evolution is explained by Darwin’stheory of natural selection, but this theory is largely qualitative rather than quantitative. Populationgenetics started morethan half a century ago as an attempt to understandevolutionary changequantitatively. Becauseevolution must take place in all individuals of a species, the changeof gene frequencyin the population has been analyzed. However, long as the facts of evolution are based on morphologicaltraits, so evolutionary change is very difficult to connect with gene frequency change except in relatively few circumstances. The remarkableprogress of molecularbiology has madeit possible to apply population genetics theory to real data. Wenowknow that genetic information is stored in linear sequences of DNA which are stably transmitted from generation to generation, and we can comparethe linear sequences of DNA and aminoacids among species. It is also possible to comparesecondary and tertiary structures of proteins and nucleic acids fromvarious sources. Becauseof such progress, someaspects of traditional neo-Darwinism are beginningto need revision. The first step in such a revision is the neutral mutation-random drift hypothesis put forward by Kimura(47) in 1968. In

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off