The Mineral Nutrition of Wild Plants

The Mineral Nutrition of Wild Plants Our understanding of plant mineral nutrition comes largely from studies of herbaceous crops that evolved from ruderal species characteristic of nutri­ ent-rich disturbed sites (52). With the development of agriculture, these ancestral species were bred for greater productivity and reproductive output at high nutrient levels where there was little selective advantage in efficient nutrient use. This paper briefly reviews the nature of crop responses to nutrient stress and compares these responses to those of species that have evolved under more natural conditions, particularly in low-nutrient envi­ ronments. I draw primarily upon nutritional studies of nitrogen and phos­ phorus because these elements most commonly limit plant growth and because their role in controlling plant growth and metabolism is most clearly understood (51). Other more specific aspects of nutritional plant ecology not discussed here include ammonium/nitrate nutrition (79), cal­ cicole/calcifuge nutrition (51,88),heavy metal tolerance (4), and serpentine ecology (133). CROP NUTRITION Nutrient Absorption ROOT-SOIL INTERACTIONS The rate of nutrient absorption by a root depends upon both nutrient supply to the root surface and active absorption by root cortical cells. Nutrient supply to the root surface depends upon (a) soil solution concentration,(b) buffering power of the soil (i.e. capacity of soil http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

The Mineral Nutrition of Wild Plants

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.es.11.110180.001313
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Our understanding of plant mineral nutrition comes largely from studies of herbaceous crops that evolved from ruderal species characteristic of nutri­ ent-rich disturbed sites (52). With the development of agriculture, these ancestral species were bred for greater productivity and reproductive output at high nutrient levels where there was little selective advantage in efficient nutrient use. This paper briefly reviews the nature of crop responses to nutrient stress and compares these responses to those of species that have evolved under more natural conditions, particularly in low-nutrient envi­ ronments. I draw primarily upon nutritional studies of nitrogen and phos­ phorus because these elements most commonly limit plant growth and because their role in controlling plant growth and metabolism is most clearly understood (51). Other more specific aspects of nutritional plant ecology not discussed here include ammonium/nitrate nutrition (79), cal­ cicole/calcifuge nutrition (51,88),heavy metal tolerance (4), and serpentine ecology (133). CROP NUTRITION Nutrient Absorption ROOT-SOIL INTERACTIONS The rate of nutrient absorption by a root depends upon both nutrient supply to the root surface and active absorption by root cortical cells. Nutrient supply to the root surface depends upon (a) soil solution concentration,(b) buffering power of the soil (i.e. capacity of soil

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1980

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