The Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants

The Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants An understanding of the mineral nutrition of higher plants depends on information from numerous scientific disciplines. Biochemically, plant nu­ trition deals with a complex of biosynthetic events by which organic plant substance is produced from inorganic materials in the environment. Physio­ logically, the definition must be broadened to include the selective acquisi­ tion of these materials from the environment and their internal distribution to places where they are needed. Although carbon nutrition is not consid­ ered in this review, the metabolism of carbon absorbed from the atmosphere is interwoven with that of other inorganic nutrients taken from the soil. Even with this exclusion, a review of mineral nutrition is a daunting task in which it may prove difficult to say anything useful. One trend in mineral nutrition which can be quickly identified by refer­ ence to past issues of the Annual Review of Plant Physiology ( 1957-1977) is that of specialization or, as some might have it, fragmentation. In these 20 years there have been 46 reviews (excluding N2 fixation) which might be classified as dealing with the biochemistry, acquisition, and distribution of mineral nutrients in various groups of plants. Of these, 8 deal more or less broadly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

The Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 31 (1) – Jun 1, 1980

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/the-mineral-nutrition-of-higher-plants-9AjuA61RTG
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.pp.31.060180.001323
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An understanding of the mineral nutrition of higher plants depends on information from numerous scientific disciplines. Biochemically, plant nu­ trition deals with a complex of biosynthetic events by which organic plant substance is produced from inorganic materials in the environment. Physio­ logically, the definition must be broadened to include the selective acquisi­ tion of these materials from the environment and their internal distribution to places where they are needed. Although carbon nutrition is not consid­ ered in this review, the metabolism of carbon absorbed from the atmosphere is interwoven with that of other inorganic nutrients taken from the soil. Even with this exclusion, a review of mineral nutrition is a daunting task in which it may prove difficult to say anything useful. One trend in mineral nutrition which can be quickly identified by refer­ ence to past issues of the Annual Review of Plant Physiology ( 1957-1977) is that of specialization or, as some might have it, fragmentation. In these 20 years there have been 46 reviews (excluding N2 fixation) which might be classified as dealing with the biochemistry, acquisition, and distribution of mineral nutrients in various groups of plants. Of these, 8 deal more or less broadly

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1980

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off