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The General-Adaptation-Syndrome

The General-Adaptation-Syndrome one might mention, among the many earlier observations pertaining to this general field, the work of Claude Bernard, who showed how important it is to maintain the constancy of the "milieu interieur," Cannon's concept of "homeostasis," Frank Hartmann's "general tissue hormone" theory of the corticoids, Dustin's observations on the "caryoclastic poisons," the "post-operative disease," the curative action of fever, foreign proteins, and of other "non-specific therapeutic agents," the "nephrotoxic sera" of Masugi and the "Goldblatt clamp" for the produc­ tion of experimental renal hypertension. At first sight, it would seem that all these observations have little in common and that there is no reason to attempt their integration into a uni­ fied system of physiologic and pathologic events. Yet, the above-mentioned monograph (l)-and indeed most of the author's research work-has been devoted to the construction of bridges between these and many additional facts since they were thought to be interconnected in nature. Through the compre�ension of their unity, we hoped to learn how to use them better for the understanding of life and the treatment of disease. The keynote of this unification was the tenet that all living organisms can respond to stress as such and that, in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Medicine Annual Reviews

The General-Adaptation-Syndrome

Annual Review of Medicine , Volume 2 (1) – Feb 1, 1951

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References (3)

Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1951 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4219
eISSN
1545-326X
DOI
10.1146/annurev.me.02.020151.001551
pmid
14847556
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

one might mention, among the many earlier observations pertaining to this general field, the work of Claude Bernard, who showed how important it is to maintain the constancy of the "milieu interieur," Cannon's concept of "homeostasis," Frank Hartmann's "general tissue hormone" theory of the corticoids, Dustin's observations on the "caryoclastic poisons," the "post-operative disease," the curative action of fever, foreign proteins, and of other "non-specific therapeutic agents," the "nephrotoxic sera" of Masugi and the "Goldblatt clamp" for the produc­ tion of experimental renal hypertension. At first sight, it would seem that all these observations have little in common and that there is no reason to attempt their integration into a uni­ fied system of physiologic and pathologic events. Yet, the above-mentioned monograph (l)-and indeed most of the author's research work-has been devoted to the construction of bridges between these and many additional facts since they were thought to be interconnected in nature. Through the compre�ension of their unity, we hoped to learn how to use them better for the understanding of life and the treatment of disease. The keynote of this unification was the tenet that all living organisms can respond to stress as such and that, in

Journal

Annual Review of MedicineAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1951

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