Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The Evolution of Inbreeding in Plants

The Evolution of Inbreeding in Plants S. K. Jain Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616 Nature . . . abhors perpetual self-fertilization. Charles Darwin (1876) I evilis brought to light, inbreeding is no more to be blamed than the detective who unearths f a crime. D. F. Jones (1925) One long-term adaptation is that a species should have the potentiality to switch to inbreed­ ing whenever the necessity arose, D. Lewis (1966) Nevertheless, self-fertilizing species are usually the ends o evolutionar lines and rarel if f y y ever contributed to ma jor evolutionary trends. G. L. Stebbins (1974) It is not sur prising . . . that at least one-third o species have ado f pted predominant selfing as a strategy in ecogenetic adaptation. R. W. Allard (1975) With their immense variety o breeding systems, plants will be extremel important f f y or comparative studies. R. C. Lewontin (1974) A full century of thought on the great diversity and evolutionary features of breed­ ing systems in plants is dramatically reflected in the rather long series of quotes above, Darwin (41 , 42), with his usual combination of genius and persuasive original 'This paper is dedicated to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/the-evolution-of-inbreeding-in-plants-mxPQj7I4yR
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1976 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
DOI
10.1146/annurev.es.07.110176.002345
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

S. K. Jain Department of Agronomy and Range Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616 Nature . . . abhors perpetual self-fertilization. Charles Darwin (1876) I evilis brought to light, inbreeding is no more to be blamed than the detective who unearths f a crime. D. F. Jones (1925) One long-term adaptation is that a species should have the potentiality to switch to inbreed­ ing whenever the necessity arose, D. Lewis (1966) Nevertheless, self-fertilizing species are usually the ends o evolutionar lines and rarel if f y y ever contributed to ma jor evolutionary trends. G. L. Stebbins (1974) It is not sur prising . . . that at least one-third o species have ado f pted predominant selfing as a strategy in ecogenetic adaptation. R. W. Allard (1975) With their immense variety o breeding systems, plants will be extremel important f f y or comparative studies. R. C. Lewontin (1974) A full century of thought on the great diversity and evolutionary features of breed­ ing systems in plants is dramatically reflected in the rather long series of quotes above, Darwin (41 , 42), with his usual combination of genius and persuasive original 'This paper is dedicated to

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1976

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month