Stimulus-Transcription Coupling in the Nervous System: Involvement of the Inducible Proto-Oncogenes fos and jun

Stimulus-Transcription Coupling in the Nervous System: Involvement of the Inducible... One of the major challenges confronting modern biologists is to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt their phenotype in response to environmental signals. Although much has been learned about the rapid and short-lived changes that occur following stimulation, relatively little is known about the processes that convert ephemeral second messenger­ mediated events into long-term cellular phenotypic alterations. This ques­ tion is of particular relevance to the neurobiologist, who must explain how brief stimulation of neurons can lead to changes in function that can persist for the lifetime of the animal. Although there are no simple answers, recently neurobiologists have been aided in their quest by concepts and reagents borrowed from the field of oncogene research. In particular, the proto-oncogene Jos has provided a novel avenue for research and a useful marker with which the effects of pharmacological, electrical, and physiologicaf stimuli may be traced in the nervous system. Here we summarize the origin and function ofJos and the set of inducible genes to 421 o 1 47-D06Xj 9 1j030 I-D421 $02.00 MORGAN & CURRAN which it belongs, and we review the literature concerning its advent in the neurosciences. THE ORIGIN OF ONCOGENES Oncogenes were first described http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Reviews

Stimulus-Transcription Coupling in the Nervous System: Involvement of the Inducible Proto-Oncogenes fos and jun

Annual Review of Neuroscience, Volume 14 (1) – Mar 1, 1991

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0147-006X
eISSN
1545-4126
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.ne.14.030191.002225
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the major challenges confronting modern biologists is to delineate the molecular mechanisms by which cells adapt their phenotype in response to environmental signals. Although much has been learned about the rapid and short-lived changes that occur following stimulation, relatively little is known about the processes that convert ephemeral second messenger­ mediated events into long-term cellular phenotypic alterations. This ques­ tion is of particular relevance to the neurobiologist, who must explain how brief stimulation of neurons can lead to changes in function that can persist for the lifetime of the animal. Although there are no simple answers, recently neurobiologists have been aided in their quest by concepts and reagents borrowed from the field of oncogene research. In particular, the proto-oncogene Jos has provided a novel avenue for research and a useful marker with which the effects of pharmacological, electrical, and physiologicaf stimuli may be traced in the nervous system. Here we summarize the origin and function ofJos and the set of inducible genes to 421 o 1 47-D06Xj 9 1j030 I-D421 $02.00 MORGAN & CURRAN which it belongs, and we review the literature concerning its advent in the neurosciences. THE ORIGIN OF ONCOGENES Oncogenes were first described

Journal

Annual Review of NeuroscienceAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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