Statistical Methods and Insights for Protein and DNA Sequences

Statistical Methods and Insights for Protein and DNA Sequences PERSPECTIVES AND OVERVIEW Among the major objectives of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis is the discovery of significant patterns related to gene expression, to protein folding and function, and to the evolutionary development of these patterns. The ability to distinguish what is likely from what is unlikely to occur by chance allows one to identify such patterns and target them for possible experimental study. For the most part, gross average assessments have guided interpretation of molecular sequence data, and researchers have paid little attention to statistical fluctuations. For example, when studying a physical map of restriction sites where adjacent sites are sep­ arated on average by 64 kb (kilobase pairs)-e.g. NOT I-one might interpret the observation of five sites within 1 50 kb as excessive clustering. However, assuming sites are distributed randomly over the genome, what is the probability that five or more such sites are seen in any IS0-kb stretch of DNA? A complementary question concerns the probability that no such restriction site is seen in a 500-kb stretch. Similarly, consider the locations in a protein of a given amino acid type (e.g. cysteines, acidic residues). How does one assess anomalies in the distribution of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Reviews

Statistical Methods and Insights for Protein and DNA Sequences

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/statistical-methods-and-insights-for-protein-and-dna-sequences-6rgkAltosj
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1936-122X
eISSN
1936-1238
DOI
10.1146/annurev.bb.20.060191.001135
pmid
1867715
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PERSPECTIVES AND OVERVIEW Among the major objectives of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis is the discovery of significant patterns related to gene expression, to protein folding and function, and to the evolutionary development of these patterns. The ability to distinguish what is likely from what is unlikely to occur by chance allows one to identify such patterns and target them for possible experimental study. For the most part, gross average assessments have guided interpretation of molecular sequence data, and researchers have paid little attention to statistical fluctuations. For example, when studying a physical map of restriction sites where adjacent sites are sep­ arated on average by 64 kb (kilobase pairs)-e.g. NOT I-one might interpret the observation of five sites within 1 50 kb as excessive clustering. However, assuming sites are distributed randomly over the genome, what is the probability that five or more such sites are seen in any IS0-kb stretch of DNA? A complementary question concerns the probability that no such restriction site is seen in a 500-kb stretch. Similarly, consider the locations in a protein of a given amino acid type (e.g. cysteines, acidic residues). How does one assess anomalies in the distribution of the

Journal

Annual Review of BiophysicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1991

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month