Spatial Scales and Global Change: Bridging the Gap from Plots to GCM Grid Cells

Spatial Scales and Global Change: Bridging the Gap from Plots to GCM Grid Cells The complexity of earth system processes results from interactions among the physical, chemical, and biological subsystems that vary in both time and . space. Gaining an understanding of these dynamics has taken on great importance in the context of current environmental change and the portent of even larger scale global change. Appreciation for the concept of "scaling" is increasing as we are challenged to integrate data and models from different disciplines and different time and space scales. In particular, biophysical and ecological information, intrinsically derived at the scale of the individual organism, must be extrapolated to the regional and global scales of climate models. Unfortunately, this may not always be a simple process due to complex spatial variations and nonlinearities in dynamics across landscapes. Bridging the gap between our site-level ecological understanding and global scale phenomena challenges our current disciplinary approach and r equ ires new strategies for acquiring and interpreting information on large-scale earth system dynamics. Research tools such as remote sensing and simulation modeling hold the potential for clarifying general ecological principles by expanding limitations inherent in site-level studies (81, 125). In combination, technologies of remote sensing, geographic information systems, and simulation modeling permit quantitative assessment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

Spatial Scales and Global Change: Bridging the Gap from Plots to GCM Grid Cells

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/spatial-scales-and-global-change-bridging-the-gap-from-plots-to-gcm-DCQhzwcgEI
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1992 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.es.23.110192.001135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The complexity of earth system processes results from interactions among the physical, chemical, and biological subsystems that vary in both time and . space. Gaining an understanding of these dynamics has taken on great importance in the context of current environmental change and the portent of even larger scale global change. Appreciation for the concept of "scaling" is increasing as we are challenged to integrate data and models from different disciplines and different time and space scales. In particular, biophysical and ecological information, intrinsically derived at the scale of the individual organism, must be extrapolated to the regional and global scales of climate models. Unfortunately, this may not always be a simple process due to complex spatial variations and nonlinearities in dynamics across landscapes. Bridging the gap between our site-level ecological understanding and global scale phenomena challenges our current disciplinary approach and r equ ires new strategies for acquiring and interpreting information on large-scale earth system dynamics. Research tools such as remote sensing and simulation modeling hold the potential for clarifying general ecological principles by expanding limitations inherent in site-level studies (81, 125). In combination, technologies of remote sensing, geographic information systems, and simulation modeling permit quantitative assessment

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off