Social Motivation

Social Motivation The concept "social motivation" has a variety of meanings (Berkowitz 1969, Brody 1980). Some authors describe it as the "social aspect of human motivation" (deCharms & Muir 1978, p. 283). It is a very broad definition. One may argue that human motivation is social by its nature, and therefore the term "social motivation" is redundant. Even so-called biological mo­ tives (drives, instincts) do not exist in humans in "pure, natural" form­ they are shaped by culture (Leont'ev 1975). This point has been stressed particularly by authors representing Marxist orientation. According to the IThis paper was prepared while the author was a visiting professor at the Institute of Child Development. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Minnesota. 0066-4308/82/0201-0123$02.00 REYKOWSKI Marxist view, the biological endowment of humans is only a potential for learning and development. All human qualities are achieved as a result of embedding the individual in a social world. In other words, all human needs, drives, and motives emerge in social interaction and all of them have social aspects. The concept of "social motivation" can be used, however, in a more specific meaning, which can be defined in the context of a general theory of motivation. The most advanced formulation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Psychology Annual Reviews

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1982 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4308
eISSN
1545-2085
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ps.33.020182.001011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The concept "social motivation" has a variety of meanings (Berkowitz 1969, Brody 1980). Some authors describe it as the "social aspect of human motivation" (deCharms & Muir 1978, p. 283). It is a very broad definition. One may argue that human motivation is social by its nature, and therefore the term "social motivation" is redundant. Even so-called biological mo­ tives (drives, instincts) do not exist in humans in "pure, natural" form­ they are shaped by culture (Leont'ev 1975). This point has been stressed particularly by authors representing Marxist orientation. According to the IThis paper was prepared while the author was a visiting professor at the Institute of Child Development. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Minnesota. 0066-4308/82/0201-0123$02.00 REYKOWSKI Marxist view, the biological endowment of humans is only a potential for learning and development. All human qualities are achieved as a result of embedding the individual in a social world. In other words, all human needs, drives, and motives emerge in social interaction and all of them have social aspects. The concept of "social motivation" can be used, however, in a more specific meaning, which can be defined in the context of a general theory of motivation. The most advanced formulation

Journal

Annual Review of PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1982

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