Similarity Laws for Constant-Pressure and Pressure-Gradient Turbulent Wall Flows

Similarity Laws for Constant-Pressure and Pressure-Gradient Turbulent Wall Flows It is well known that the nonlinearity of fluid mechanics equations makes all the dynamic equations of turbulent flows nonclosed. If we add the equations for the new unknowns (higher-order moments), then the number of the unknowns in the equations will increase faster than the number of the equations themselves. Therefore the equations of turbulent flows cannot be solved without the use of some supplementary speculative closure hypotheses. There is an enormous amount of literature devoted to the different closure methods (i.e. various semiempirical model equations of turbulence), their applications to specific turbulent flows, and comparison of the results obtained with the results of other theories and with experiments (see, e.g., Launder & Spalding 1972, Rotta 1973, Reynolds 1976). Of course, none of the semiempirical theories is strict, and they include a number of empirical constants and lead to different conclusions. However, there are also results pertaining to turbulent flow that may be obtained with the aid of general physical reasoning without any use of dynamic equations and closure hypotheses. Similarity and dimensional arguments are, apparently, the most important general methods for obtaining meaningful results without solving the dynamical equations (Bridgman 1932, Sedov 1959):This review is devoted to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics Annual Reviews

Similarity Laws for Constant-Pressure and Pressure-Gradient Turbulent Wall Flows

Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, Volume 11 (1) – Jan 1, 1979

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1979 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4189
eISSN
1545-4479
DOI
10.1146/annurev.fl.11.010179.002445
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is well known that the nonlinearity of fluid mechanics equations makes all the dynamic equations of turbulent flows nonclosed. If we add the equations for the new unknowns (higher-order moments), then the number of the unknowns in the equations will increase faster than the number of the equations themselves. Therefore the equations of turbulent flows cannot be solved without the use of some supplementary speculative closure hypotheses. There is an enormous amount of literature devoted to the different closure methods (i.e. various semiempirical model equations of turbulence), their applications to specific turbulent flows, and comparison of the results obtained with the results of other theories and with experiments (see, e.g., Launder & Spalding 1972, Rotta 1973, Reynolds 1976). Of course, none of the semiempirical theories is strict, and they include a number of empirical constants and lead to different conclusions. However, there are also results pertaining to turbulent flow that may be obtained with the aid of general physical reasoning without any use of dynamic equations and closure hypotheses. Similarity and dimensional arguments are, apparently, the most important general methods for obtaining meaningful results without solving the dynamical equations (Bridgman 1932, Sedov 1959):This review is devoted to

Journal

Annual Review of Fluid MechanicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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