Secretion of Extracellular Virulence Factors by Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

Secretion of Extracellular Virulence Factors by Plant Pathogenic Bacteria Many bacterial plant pathogens produce extracellular products that contribute to virulence (21). What constitutes an extracellular virulence factor? In prin­ ciple, any molecule presented on the bacterial cell surface or translocated to the extracellular environment could act as a virulence determinant if it influ­ ences growth of the pathogen in planta. Loosely defined in this fashion, "extracellular" virulence factors include plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, toxins, DNA,hormones, siderophores, and signaling molecules (e.g. see 9, 15, 21, 27, 49, 50). Also, cell surface-anchored structures such as pili, flagella, lipopolysaccharide, exopolysaccharide slime layers, and outer membrane pro­ teins could have roles in bacterial survival within, or ingression of, the host plant (e.g. see 9, 18, 24). With such a broad definition of "extracellular" virulence factors it is not possible to cover the corresponding transport pro­ cesses involved in each case in this review. Consequently, I concentrate on a review of the secretion of a selection of molecules, particularly proteins, which are targeted totally outside of the bacterial cell, and will generally exclude discussion of the cell surface-anchored/associated structures, except in isolated cases. In addition, I concentrate exclusively on gram-negative bacterial plant 0066-4286/94/0901-0181$05. 00 SALMOND pathogens since little information is available on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Phytopathology Annual Reviews

Secretion of Extracellular Virulence Factors by Plant Pathogenic Bacteria

Annual Review of Phytopathology, Volume 32 (1) – Sep 1, 1994

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1994 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4286
eISSN
1545-2107
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.py.32.090194.001145
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many bacterial plant pathogens produce extracellular products that contribute to virulence (21). What constitutes an extracellular virulence factor? In prin­ ciple, any molecule presented on the bacterial cell surface or translocated to the extracellular environment could act as a virulence determinant if it influ­ ences growth of the pathogen in planta. Loosely defined in this fashion, "extracellular" virulence factors include plant cell wall-degrading enzymes, toxins, DNA,hormones, siderophores, and signaling molecules (e.g. see 9, 15, 21, 27, 49, 50). Also, cell surface-anchored structures such as pili, flagella, lipopolysaccharide, exopolysaccharide slime layers, and outer membrane pro­ teins could have roles in bacterial survival within, or ingression of, the host plant (e.g. see 9, 18, 24). With such a broad definition of "extracellular" virulence factors it is not possible to cover the corresponding transport pro­ cesses involved in each case in this review. Consequently, I concentrate on a review of the secretion of a selection of molecules, particularly proteins, which are targeted totally outside of the bacterial cell, and will generally exclude discussion of the cell surface-anchored/associated structures, except in isolated cases. In addition, I concentrate exclusively on gram-negative bacterial plant 0066-4286/94/0901-0181$05. 00 SALMOND pathogens since little information is available on

Journal

Annual Review of PhytopathologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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