Resistance in Malus to Venturia Inaequalis

Resistance in Malus to Venturia Inaequalis Scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis ( eke .) Wint., has been one of the most serious and difficult diseases of apple to control. Because of the neces­ sity of careful timing of application and difficulty in eradication, fungicides are frequently not effective. The best means of control appears to depend on the development of resistant varieties. Knight (69) has compiled an excel­ lent bibliography of research on pome fruit breeding and genetics up to 1960. In this review, we will discuss research dealing with types and sources of resistance in the host, pertinent facts about the fungus, and the present status of knowledge on the nature of the host-parasite interaction. THE HOST ini­ tial attempts in apple improvement. The first recorded attempt (143) was in France in 1683 by Venette, who sowed open pollinated seed with the aim of securing new varieties. The crossing method was established in 1796 in Ger­ many by Diel, who developed most of the techniques of emasculation of flowers, collection of pollen, and transfer of poll en t o stigmas. D uring the latter part of the 18th Century, Thomas Knight of England conducted hy­ bridizing experiments with apple (32). Fruit breeding in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Phytopathology Annual Reviews

Resistance in Malus to Venturia Inaequalis

Annual Review of Phytopathology, Volume 7 (1) – Sep 1, 1969

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1969 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4286
eISSN
1545-2107
DOI
10.1146/annurev.py.07.090169.001255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis ( eke .) Wint., has been one of the most serious and difficult diseases of apple to control. Because of the neces­ sity of careful timing of application and difficulty in eradication, fungicides are frequently not effective. The best means of control appears to depend on the development of resistant varieties. Knight (69) has compiled an excel­ lent bibliography of research on pome fruit breeding and genetics up to 1960. In this review, we will discuss research dealing with types and sources of resistance in the host, pertinent facts about the fungus, and the present status of knowledge on the nature of the host-parasite interaction. THE HOST ini­ tial attempts in apple improvement. The first recorded attempt (143) was in France in 1683 by Venette, who sowed open pollinated seed with the aim of securing new varieties. The crossing method was established in 1796 in Ger­ many by Diel, who developed most of the techniques of emasculation of flowers, collection of pollen, and transfer of poll en t o stigmas. D uring the latter part of the 18th Century, Thomas Knight of England conducted hy­ bridizing experiments with apple (32). Fruit breeding in

Journal

Annual Review of PhytopathologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Sep 1, 1969

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