Quantitative Interpretation of Phloem Translocation Data

Quantitative Interpretation of Phloem Translocation Data Like most subjects central to plant physiology,phloem transport has been reviewed extensively in recent years (e.g. 1,5,6,12,14,36,44,70,71,84). The mechanisms of translocation are still elusive, possibly because it has rarely been possible to interpret experiments quantitatively. Many reviews have been quantitative in some respects, i.e. energy requirements of proposed mechanisms,phloem structure and distribution throughout the plant or its nutrient content, but have tended to be qualitative in describing the mechanism. The few exceptions to this have tended to go into detailed mechanistic analysis with little attempt at interpreting whole plant experi­ ments. The most demanding requirement for any theory is faced when quantita­ tive comparison is made between the theory and experimental findings. There are few such comparisons in the literature, and the authors believe that detailed function of phloem transport will not be understood until such comparison is made. The lack of a quantitative description of translocation is probably, at least in part, due to the complexity of the total translocation process. Transloca­ tion incorporates many poorly understood processes, including loading of sugar into the phloem,its subsequent transport,and its unloading at multi­ ple sites distributed throughout the plant. It is inevitable that such a pro-. cess, involving the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Quantitative Interpretation of Phloem Translocation Data

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
DOI
10.1146/annurev.pp.31.060180.001203
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Like most subjects central to plant physiology,phloem transport has been reviewed extensively in recent years (e.g. 1,5,6,12,14,36,44,70,71,84). The mechanisms of translocation are still elusive, possibly because it has rarely been possible to interpret experiments quantitatively. Many reviews have been quantitative in some respects, i.e. energy requirements of proposed mechanisms,phloem structure and distribution throughout the plant or its nutrient content, but have tended to be qualitative in describing the mechanism. The few exceptions to this have tended to go into detailed mechanistic analysis with little attempt at interpreting whole plant experi­ ments. The most demanding requirement for any theory is faced when quantita­ tive comparison is made between the theory and experimental findings. There are few such comparisons in the literature, and the authors believe that detailed function of phloem transport will not be understood until such comparison is made. The lack of a quantitative description of translocation is probably, at least in part, due to the complexity of the total translocation process. Transloca­ tion incorporates many poorly understood processes, including loading of sugar into the phloem,its subsequent transport,and its unloading at multi­ ple sites distributed throughout the plant. It is inevitable that such a pro-. cess, involving the

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1980

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