Principles of Insect Cold-Hardiness

Principles of Insect Cold-Hardiness Cold is a relative term which for present purposes will be considered to encompass temperatures too low to support normal development of the in­ sects concerned. The effects of cold on insects may be manifold, but a pri­ mary distinction must be made on the hasis of whether freezing does or does not result. The dividing line, however, is seldom at the freezing point of the tissues but rather at the supercooling point, for insects almost invariably supercool to some extent, usually many degrees. Cooling without freezing has been termed "chilling" (9), particularly when the emphasis is on temperatures above O°C. Such investigations usually deal with i nsects that do not normally e ncounter cold, e.g., household pests. Unaccustomed to cold, they tolerate it poorly. On the other hand, insects that hibernate in temperate and colder climates must tolerate a wide range of low temperatures, often for long periods. Some species improve their toler­ ance through processes of cold-acclimation and cold-hardening. All insects supercool to some extent, regardless of need; in fact, some that need to do so least supercool below -40°C. Most hibernating insects do need to supercool, however, to avoid freezing, which would be fatal; the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Entomology Annual Reviews

Principles of Insect Cold-Hardiness

Annual Review of Entomology, Volume 6 (1) – Jan 1, 1961

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1961 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4170
eISSN
1545-4487
DOI
10.1146/annurev.en.06.010161.000415
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cold is a relative term which for present purposes will be considered to encompass temperatures too low to support normal development of the in­ sects concerned. The effects of cold on insects may be manifold, but a pri­ mary distinction must be made on the hasis of whether freezing does or does not result. The dividing line, however, is seldom at the freezing point of the tissues but rather at the supercooling point, for insects almost invariably supercool to some extent, usually many degrees. Cooling without freezing has been termed "chilling" (9), particularly when the emphasis is on temperatures above O°C. Such investigations usually deal with i nsects that do not normally e ncounter cold, e.g., household pests. Unaccustomed to cold, they tolerate it poorly. On the other hand, insects that hibernate in temperate and colder climates must tolerate a wide range of low temperatures, often for long periods. Some species improve their toler­ ance through processes of cold-acclimation and cold-hardening. All insects supercool to some extent, regardless of need; in fact, some that need to do so least supercool below -40°C. Most hibernating insects do need to supercool, however, to avoid freezing, which would be fatal; the

Journal

Annual Review of EntomologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jan 1, 1961

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