Plant Architecture and the Diversity of Phytophagous Insects

Plant Architecture and the Diversity of Phytophagous Insects In general, trees have richer insect faunas than herbs. This familiar observa­ tion is but one of several ways in which "plant architecture" and insect species diversity are correlated. In this review I explore the nature of these correlations and ask how they are produced. To keep within reasonable bounds I have restricted attention to herbivorous insects that consume living, green plant material (93, 102). Pollinators, scavengers, predators and "travellers" on plants (60) are willfully ignored. For the same reason, single species of plants and their associated insects receive most attention. Ex­ trapolations to entire plant communities are made cautiously in the final section. Architecture in everyday English means the structure and design of things; I have used it as shorthand for a variety of plant attributes, particu­ larly size and growth form and the seasonal development, persistence, and variety of above-ground parts (48, 52). It will be convenient, first, to estab­ lish the broad effects of plant architecture on herbivore diversity before moving to more detailed studies in the second half of the review. Studies of many kinds of ecological systems reveal effects of habitat complexity (architecture) on species diversity (54). Hence, their discovery among plant-feeding insects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Entomology Annual Reviews

Plant Architecture and the Diversity of Phytophagous Insects

Annual Review of Entomology, Volume 28 (1) – Jan 1, 1983

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/plant-architecture-and-the-diversity-of-phytophagous-insects-8vxjwIojxf
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1983 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4170
eISSN
1545-4487
DOI
10.1146/annurev.en.28.010183.000323
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In general, trees have richer insect faunas than herbs. This familiar observa­ tion is but one of several ways in which "plant architecture" and insect species diversity are correlated. In this review I explore the nature of these correlations and ask how they are produced. To keep within reasonable bounds I have restricted attention to herbivorous insects that consume living, green plant material (93, 102). Pollinators, scavengers, predators and "travellers" on plants (60) are willfully ignored. For the same reason, single species of plants and their associated insects receive most attention. Ex­ trapolations to entire plant communities are made cautiously in the final section. Architecture in everyday English means the structure and design of things; I have used it as shorthand for a variety of plant attributes, particu­ larly size and growth form and the seasonal development, persistence, and variety of above-ground parts (48, 52). It will be convenient, first, to estab­ lish the broad effects of plant architecture on herbivore diversity before moving to more detailed studies in the second half of the review. Studies of many kinds of ecological systems reveal effects of habitat complexity (architecture) on species diversity (54). Hence, their discovery among plant-feeding insects

Journal

Annual Review of EntomologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jan 1, 1983

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off