Photosynthetic Response and Adaptation to Temperature in Higher Plants

Photosynthetic Response and Adaptation to Temperature in Higher Plants Temperature is prominent among the major tcological variables that deter­ mine the natural distribution of plants. Habitats occupied by higher plants show dramatic differences in the prevailing temperature during the period of active growth, ranging from near freezing in certain arctic and alpine environments to over 50°C in the hottest deserts. Moreover, in many habi­ tats the same plant individual is subjected to a very wide seasonal variation in temperature regime and even diurnal temperature fluctuation can be considerable. Like almost all other growth processe:., photosynthesis is strongly affected by temperature. In most plants, chllnges in photosynthetic rate in response to temperature are reversible over a considerable range (commonly 10° to 35°C), but exposure to temperatures l:>elow or above this range may perature dependence of the process in the mnge over which the functional cause irreversible injury to the photosynthetic system. Thus, in addition to the effect of temperature on photosynthesis arising from the intrinsic tem­ integrity of the photosynthetic apparatus remains intact, extreme tempera­ tures can drastically inhibit photosynthesis by disrupting the integrity of the system. differences in their photosynthetic respons�: to temperature, and especially in their ability to maintain functional integrity at low and high temperature http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Photosynthetic Response and Adaptation to Temperature in Higher Plants

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 31 (1) – Jun 1, 1980

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.pp.31.060180.002423
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Temperature is prominent among the major tcological variables that deter­ mine the natural distribution of plants. Habitats occupied by higher plants show dramatic differences in the prevailing temperature during the period of active growth, ranging from near freezing in certain arctic and alpine environments to over 50°C in the hottest deserts. Moreover, in many habi­ tats the same plant individual is subjected to a very wide seasonal variation in temperature regime and even diurnal temperature fluctuation can be considerable. Like almost all other growth processe:., photosynthesis is strongly affected by temperature. In most plants, chllnges in photosynthetic rate in response to temperature are reversible over a considerable range (commonly 10° to 35°C), but exposure to temperatures l:>elow or above this range may perature dependence of the process in the mnge over which the functional cause irreversible injury to the photosynthetic system. Thus, in addition to the effect of temperature on photosynthesis arising from the intrinsic tem­ integrity of the photosynthetic apparatus remains intact, extreme tempera­ tures can drastically inhibit photosynthesis by disrupting the integrity of the system. differences in their photosynthetic respons�: to temperature, and especially in their ability to maintain functional integrity at low and high temperature

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1980

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