MORE EFFICIENT PLANTS: A Consequence of Rising Atmospheric CO 2 ?

MORE EFFICIENT PLANTS: A Consequence of Rising Atmospheric CO 2 ? ▪ Abstract The primary effect of the response of plants to rising atmospheric CO 2 (C a ) is to increase resource use efficiency. Elevated C a reduces stomatal conductance and transpiration and improves water use efficiency, and at the same time it stimulates higher rates of photosynthesis and increases light-use efficiency. Acclimation of photosynthesis during long-term exposure to elevated C a reduces key enzymes of the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, and this increases nutrient use efficiency. Improved soil–water balance, increased carbon uptake in the shade, greater carbon to nitrogen ratio, and reduced nutrient quality for insect and animal grazers are all possibilities that have been observed in field studies of the effects of elevated C a . These effects have major consequences for agriculture and native ecosystems in a world of rising atmospheric C a and climate change. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

MORE EFFICIENT PLANTS: A Consequence of Rising Atmospheric CO 2 ?

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 by Annual Reviews Inc. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
DOI
10.1146/annurev.arplant.48.1.609
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

▪ Abstract The primary effect of the response of plants to rising atmospheric CO 2 (C a ) is to increase resource use efficiency. Elevated C a reduces stomatal conductance and transpiration and improves water use efficiency, and at the same time it stimulates higher rates of photosynthesis and increases light-use efficiency. Acclimation of photosynthesis during long-term exposure to elevated C a reduces key enzymes of the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, and this increases nutrient use efficiency. Improved soil–water balance, increased carbon uptake in the shade, greater carbon to nitrogen ratio, and reduced nutrient quality for insect and animal grazers are all possibilities that have been observed in field studies of the effects of elevated C a . These effects have major consequences for agriculture and native ecosystems in a world of rising atmospheric C a and climate change.

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1997

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