MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF TRICHOME DEVELOPMENT IN ARABIDOPSIS

MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF TRICHOME DEVELOPMENT IN ARABIDOPSIS ▪ Abstract Two basic questions in developmental biology are: How does a cell know when it should or should not differentiate, and once a cell is committed to differentiate, how is that process controlled? The first process regulates the arrangement or pattern of the various cell types, whereas the second makes cells functionally distinct. Together, these two processes define plant morphogenesis. Trichome development in Arabidopsis provides an excellent model to analyze these questions. First, trichome development in Arabidopsis is a relatively simple process. A single epidermal cell differentiates into a unicellular trichome. Second, this differentiation occurs in a nonrandom pattern on the plant surface. Finally, the process is amenable to genetic analysis because many mutations that affect trichome differentiation do not alter other aspects of plant development. Thus far, more than 20 genes affecting trichome development have been identified. This review examines the current state of our understanding of these genes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

MOLECULAR GENETIC ANALYSIS OF TRICHOME DEVELOPMENT IN ARABIDOPSIS

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 48 (1) – Jun 1, 1997

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Annual Reviews Inc. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.arplant.48.1.137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

▪ Abstract Two basic questions in developmental biology are: How does a cell know when it should or should not differentiate, and once a cell is committed to differentiate, how is that process controlled? The first process regulates the arrangement or pattern of the various cell types, whereas the second makes cells functionally distinct. Together, these two processes define plant morphogenesis. Trichome development in Arabidopsis provides an excellent model to analyze these questions. First, trichome development in Arabidopsis is a relatively simple process. A single epidermal cell differentiates into a unicellular trichome. Second, this differentiation occurs in a nonrandom pattern on the plant surface. Finally, the process is amenable to genetic analysis because many mutations that affect trichome differentiation do not alter other aspects of plant development. Thus far, more than 20 genes affecting trichome development have been identified. This review examines the current state of our understanding of these genes.

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1997

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