Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Nonhalophytes

Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Nonhalophytes Mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes which grow rapidly at high salinity have been reviewed recently in this series by Flowers et al (34). Here we review mechanisms of tolerance in nonhalophytes, restricting ourselves to ion and water relations and omitting other aspects such as hormonal controls. Responses of crops to salinity in terms of yield have been reviewed by Maas & Hoffman (83). There are very large differences between species, e.g. a 50 percent yield reduction occurs for beans at 60 m M and for sugar beet at 260 mM monovalent salts [calculated from (83)]. The growth response of cultivated species to salinity overlaps with that of halophytes (Figure 1), and this is not surprising since some species, such as sugar beet, have halo­ phytic ancestors. Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is found in salt marshes in association with Atriplex hastata and Suaeda fructicosa ( 14). We have adopted the ecological definition of halophytes used by Jennings (65): "the native flora of saline soils," and have assumed that soils in this context contain solutions with a IT of at least 3.3 bar, being equivalent to 70 mM monovalent salts [calculated from (106)]. It has been recognized since the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Nonhalophytes

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 31 (1) – Jun 1, 1980

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/mechanisms-of-salt-tolerance-in-nonhalophytes-nRTkcBjXW1
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1980 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.pp.31.060180.001053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes which grow rapidly at high salinity have been reviewed recently in this series by Flowers et al (34). Here we review mechanisms of tolerance in nonhalophytes, restricting ourselves to ion and water relations and omitting other aspects such as hormonal controls. Responses of crops to salinity in terms of yield have been reviewed by Maas & Hoffman (83). There are very large differences between species, e.g. a 50 percent yield reduction occurs for beans at 60 m M and for sugar beet at 260 mM monovalent salts [calculated from (83)]. The growth response of cultivated species to salinity overlaps with that of halophytes (Figure 1), and this is not surprising since some species, such as sugar beet, have halo­ phytic ancestors. Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is found in salt marshes in association with Atriplex hastata and Suaeda fructicosa ( 14). We have adopted the ecological definition of halophytes used by Jennings (65): "the native flora of saline soils," and have assumed that soils in this context contain solutions with a IT of at least 3.3 bar, being equivalent to 70 mM monovalent salts [calculated from (106)]. It has been recognized since the

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1980

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off