Managing North American Waterfowl in the Face of Uncertainty

Managing North American Waterfowl in the Face of Uncertainty The term "waterfowl" refers collectively to members of the family Anatidae­ ducks, geese, and swans. Waterfowl have been referred to as "the most promi­ nent and e:conomically important group of migratory birds in North America" (24). The breeding distributions of the 45 species of waterfowl that are native breeders in North America range from the southern United States to Alaska and the Canadian arctic (7). As suggested by the term "waterfowl," wetlands are an essential habitat component for these species throughout their ranges. Most NOI1th American species are migratory, breeding in the northern United States andl Canada during the spring and summer and migrating along tradi­ tional pathways to wintering grounds in the United States and, for some species, Mexico and even Central and South America. The prairies of north­ central United States and south-central Canada are an extremely important breeding area for many duck species, whereas many goose and swan species breed fartlher north in Alaska and the Canadian arctic. Waterfowl hunting and associated management efforts have a long history in North America. This history has been closely linked with scientific inves­ tigations of waterfowl ecology that have guided waterfowl management over the years. Monitoring programs were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

Managing North American Waterfowl in the Face of Uncertainty

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1995 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.es.26.110195.001141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The term "waterfowl" refers collectively to members of the family Anatidae­ ducks, geese, and swans. Waterfowl have been referred to as "the most promi­ nent and e:conomically important group of migratory birds in North America" (24). The breeding distributions of the 45 species of waterfowl that are native breeders in North America range from the southern United States to Alaska and the Canadian arctic (7). As suggested by the term "waterfowl," wetlands are an essential habitat component for these species throughout their ranges. Most NOI1th American species are migratory, breeding in the northern United States andl Canada during the spring and summer and migrating along tradi­ tional pathways to wintering grounds in the United States and, for some species, Mexico and even Central and South America. The prairies of north­ central United States and south-central Canada are an extremely important breeding area for many duck species, whereas many goose and swan species breed fartlher north in Alaska and the Canadian arctic. Waterfowl hunting and associated management efforts have a long history in North America. This history has been closely linked with scientific inves­ tigations of waterfowl ecology that have guided waterfowl management over the years. Monitoring programs were

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1995

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