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Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Velocity Mapping in Chemical Engineering Applications

Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Velocity Mapping in Chemical Engineering Applications This review aims to illustrate the diversity of measurements that can be made using magnetic resonance techniques, which have the potential to provide insights into chemical engineering systems that cannot readily be achieved using any other method. Perhaps the most notable advantage in using magnetic resonance methods is that both chemistry and transport can be followed in three dimensions, in optically opaque systems, and without the need for tracers to be introduced into the system. Here we focus on hydrodynamics and, in particular, applications to rheology, pipe flow, and fixed-bed and gas-solid fluidized bed reactors. With increasing development of industrially relevant sample environments and undersampling data acquisition strategies that can reduce acquisition times to <1 s, magnetic resonance is finding increasing application in chemical engineering research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Annual Reviews

Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Velocity Mapping in Chemical Engineering Applications

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
1947-5438
eISSN
1947-5446
DOI
10.1146/annurev-chembioeng-061114-123222
pmid
28592175
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This review aims to illustrate the diversity of measurements that can be made using magnetic resonance techniques, which have the potential to provide insights into chemical engineering systems that cannot readily be achieved using any other method. Perhaps the most notable advantage in using magnetic resonance methods is that both chemistry and transport can be followed in three dimensions, in optically opaque systems, and without the need for tracers to be introduced into the system. Here we focus on hydrodynamics and, in particular, applications to rheology, pipe flow, and fixed-bed and gas-solid fluidized bed reactors. With increasing development of industrially relevant sample environments and undersampling data acquisition strategies that can reduce acquisition times to <1 s, magnetic resonance is finding increasing application in chemical engineering research.

Journal

Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular EngineeringAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 7, 2017

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