Interpersonal Processes in Close Relationships

Interpersonal Processes in Close Relationships The last time the Annual Review of Psychology dealt with the psychology of relationships was in 1978, when Huston & Levinger discussed recent ad­ vances in the study of attraction and relationships. Eighty percent of that research, they mai ntai ned, i nvolved subjects who were "personally irrele­ va nt" to each other, in the sense that they had never met before, did not expect to see each other in the future, and might not come face-to-face during the study. Perhaps because this paradigm seemed to many psychologists limited i n its usefulness for u nderstanding relationships, and perhaps because William Proxmire's bestowal of a "Golden Fleece" award upon some of the best work in this area made such research politically problematic, research activity waned in the late 1 970s and early 1980s. Fortu nately, with a tum toward more realistic laboratory and naturalistic research designs, this decline has been reversed in recent years, so that in the ebb and flow of research productivity, close relationships are once again riding a wave of growing e nthusiasm. Signs of this trend are abundant. Journal articles reporting new theoretical positions and empirical findi ngs appear with i ncreasi ng frequency; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Psychology Annual Reviews

Interpersonal Processes in Close Relationships

Annual Review of Psychology, Volume 39 (1) – Feb 1, 1988

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1988 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4308
eISSN
1545-2085
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ps.39.020188.003141
pmid
3278682
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The last time the Annual Review of Psychology dealt with the psychology of relationships was in 1978, when Huston & Levinger discussed recent ad­ vances in the study of attraction and relationships. Eighty percent of that research, they mai ntai ned, i nvolved subjects who were "personally irrele­ va nt" to each other, in the sense that they had never met before, did not expect to see each other in the future, and might not come face-to-face during the study. Perhaps because this paradigm seemed to many psychologists limited i n its usefulness for u nderstanding relationships, and perhaps because William Proxmire's bestowal of a "Golden Fleece" award upon some of the best work in this area made such research politically problematic, research activity waned in the late 1 970s and early 1980s. Fortu nately, with a tum toward more realistic laboratory and naturalistic research designs, this decline has been reversed in recent years, so that in the ebb and flow of research productivity, close relationships are once again riding a wave of growing e nthusiasm. Signs of this trend are abundant. Journal articles reporting new theoretical positions and empirical findi ngs appear with i ncreasi ng frequency;

Journal

Annual Review of PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1988

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