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Institutional Theories of Organization

Institutional Theories of Organization Lynne G. Zucker Department of Sociology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 INSTITUTIONAL THEORIES OF ORGANIZATION Institutional theories of organizations provide a rich, complex view of orga­ nizations. In these theories, organizations are influenced by normative pres­ sures, sometimes arising from external sources such as the state, other times arising from within the organization itself. Under some conditions, these pressures lead the organization to be guided by le gitimated clements, from standard operating procedures to professional certification and state require­ ment, which often have the effect of directing attention away from task performance. Adoption of these legitimated elements, leading to isomorphism with the institutional environment, increases the probability of survival. Institutional theories of organization have spread rapidly, a testimony to the power of the imaginative ideas developed in theoretical and empirical work. As rigor increases, with better specification of indicators and models, it is likely to attract the attention of an even larger number of organizational researchers. Institutional theory is inherently difficult to explicate, because it taps taken-for-granted assumptions at the core of social action. The main goal of this review, then, is to make institutional theory more accessible. The review begins with a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Sociology Annual Reviews

Institutional Theories of Organization

Annual Review of Sociology , Volume 13 (1) – Aug 1, 1987

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References (68)

Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0360-0572
eISSN
1545-2115
DOI
10.1146/annurev.so.13.080187.002303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lynne G. Zucker Department of Sociology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 INSTITUTIONAL THEORIES OF ORGANIZATION Institutional theories of organizations provide a rich, complex view of orga­ nizations. In these theories, organizations are influenced by normative pres­ sures, sometimes arising from external sources such as the state, other times arising from within the organization itself. Under some conditions, these pressures lead the organization to be guided by le gitimated clements, from standard operating procedures to professional certification and state require­ ment, which often have the effect of directing attention away from task performance. Adoption of these legitimated elements, leading to isomorphism with the institutional environment, increases the probability of survival. Institutional theories of organization have spread rapidly, a testimony to the power of the imaginative ideas developed in theoretical and empirical work. As rigor increases, with better specification of indicators and models, it is likely to attract the attention of an even larger number of organizational researchers. Institutional theory is inherently difficult to explicate, because it taps taken-for-granted assumptions at the core of social action. The main goal of this review, then, is to make institutional theory more accessible. The review begins with a

Journal

Annual Review of SociologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Aug 1, 1987

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