Hypothalamic Integration: Organization of the Paraventricular and Supraoptic Nuclei

Hypothalamic Integration: Organization of the Paraventricular and Supraoptic Nuclei Living organisms display a remarkable capacity to maintain a relatively constant internal milieu in the face of unrelenting challenges posed by the requirements of metabolism, and by an often hostile environment. This stability is assured by a series of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral mechanisms that have become ever more complex during the course of evolution. In vertebrates, the central nervous system mediates a broad range of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses that maintain homeosta­ sis, and a great deal of work indicates that the hypothalamus, in particular, plays a critical role in the coordination of such responses (for recent reviews see Morgane & Panksepp 1980). In mammals, the hypothalamus is thought to regulate body temperature, the cardiovascular system, and the abdominal viscera, as well as ingestive behaviors that replenish nutrients and water, and sexual and maternal behaviors that assure survival of the species. The neural mechanisms underlying such adaptive responses have been difficult to unravel, and remain largely undefined in terms of specific an­ tomical circuitry (Swanson & Mogenson 1981). This is due primarily to the fact that the hypothalamus, which is commonly regarded as the rostralmost part of the reticular formation, is a poorly differentiated region, with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Reviews

Hypothalamic Integration: Organization of the Paraventricular and Supraoptic Nuclei

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/hypothalamic-integration-organization-of-the-paraventricular-and-nGMDHA9AYt
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1983 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0147-006X
eISSN
1545-4126
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ne.06.030183.001413
pmid
6132586
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Living organisms display a remarkable capacity to maintain a relatively constant internal milieu in the face of unrelenting challenges posed by the requirements of metabolism, and by an often hostile environment. This stability is assured by a series of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral mechanisms that have become ever more complex during the course of evolution. In vertebrates, the central nervous system mediates a broad range of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses that maintain homeosta­ sis, and a great deal of work indicates that the hypothalamus, in particular, plays a critical role in the coordination of such responses (for recent reviews see Morgane & Panksepp 1980). In mammals, the hypothalamus is thought to regulate body temperature, the cardiovascular system, and the abdominal viscera, as well as ingestive behaviors that replenish nutrients and water, and sexual and maternal behaviors that assure survival of the species. The neural mechanisms underlying such adaptive responses have been difficult to unravel, and remain largely undefined in terms of specific an­ tomical circuitry (Swanson & Mogenson 1981). This is due primarily to the fact that the hypothalamus, which is commonly regarded as the rostralmost part of the reticular formation, is a poorly differentiated region, with

Journal

Annual Review of NeuroscienceAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 1, 1983

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off