Herbicide Resistance in Weedy Plants: Physiology and Population Biology

Herbicide Resistance in Weedy Plants: Physiology and Population Biology HISTORY AND DISTRIBUTION OF HERBICIDE RESISTANCE Predictions of the likely occurrence of herbicide resistance in plants (34) were followed by the first discovery of a triazine-resistant biotype of Senecio vulgaris in the United States in 1968 (66). Since then, and particularly in recent years, the number of reported cases of herbicide resistant weed species has rapidly increased, as has the variety of herbicides to which resistance has evolved. There are over 100 weed species with biotypes known to be resistant to herbicides (Table 1, see also 5, 27, 38, 44); these have been the subject of several symposia, reviews, etc (e.g. 26, 38, 39, 43). Given the enormous literature in this field, citations in this review are limited to key papers, reviews, and current papers. Herbicide resistance may be defined as the condition whereby a plant withstands the normal field dose of a herbicide, as a result of selection and genetic response to repeated exposure to herbicides with a similar mode of action. Susceptible plants are normally killed by recommended field doses. For the remainder of this review susceptible and resistant biotypes, plants, populations, etc, of a given species will be designated as S- and R-, respec­ tively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

Herbicide Resistance in Weedy Plants: Physiology and Population Biology

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Abstract

HISTORY AND DISTRIBUTION OF HERBICIDE RESISTANCE Predictions of the likely occurrence of herbicide resistance in plants (34) were followed by the first discovery of a triazine-resistant biotype of Senecio vulgaris in the United States in 1968 (66). Since then, and particularly in recent years, the number of reported cases of herbicide resistant weed species has rapidly increased, as has the variety of herbicides to which resistance has evolved. There are over 100 weed species with biotypes known to be resistant to herbicides (Table 1, see also 5, 27, 38, 44); these have been the subject of several symposia, reviews, etc (e.g. 26, 38, 39, 43). Given the enormous literature in this field, citations in this review are limited to key papers, reviews, and current papers. Herbicide resistance may be defined as the condition whereby a plant withstands the normal field dose of a herbicide, as a result of selection and genetic response to repeated exposure to herbicides with a similar mode of action. Susceptible plants are normally killed by recommended field doses. For the remainder of this review susceptible and resistant biotypes, plants, populations, etc, of a given species will be designated as S- and R-, respec­ tively.

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1991

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