Genetic Revolutions, Founder Effects, and Speciation

Genetic Revolutions, Founder Effects, and Speciation Are new species formed in rare catastrophes , distinct from the normal proces­ ses of phyletic evulution? Or does reproductive isolation evolve gradually , as a by-product of the divergence of gene pools? Mayr (120--124) has argued the former, holding that speciation usually results from genetic revolutions trig­ gered by founder effects: An isolated population, small in numbers and in geographic extent , colonizes a new area. Both changes in selection pressures and genetic drift result in the rapid shift of many genes to a new, coadapted combination , which is reproductively isolated from the ancestral population. Carson (27 , 29, 31) and Templeton (175-180), among others, have put forward similar models . This cluster of theories is woven from many strands; we will try to tease these apart in order to find out precisely which processes may be involved in speciation by founder effect. By placing them in the context of other models , we will argue that, although founder effects may cause speciation under sufficiently stringent conditions, they are only one extreme of a continuous range of possibilities. Complete geographic isolation is unnecessary; absolute coadaptation between "closed" systems of alleles is unlikely; and divergence may be http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Annual Reviews

Genetic Revolutions, Founder Effects, and Speciation

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1984 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4162
DOI
10.1146/annurev.es.15.110184.001025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Are new species formed in rare catastrophes , distinct from the normal proces­ ses of phyletic evulution? Or does reproductive isolation evolve gradually , as a by-product of the divergence of gene pools? Mayr (120--124) has argued the former, holding that speciation usually results from genetic revolutions trig­ gered by founder effects: An isolated population, small in numbers and in geographic extent , colonizes a new area. Both changes in selection pressures and genetic drift result in the rapid shift of many genes to a new, coadapted combination , which is reproductively isolated from the ancestral population. Carson (27 , 29, 31) and Templeton (175-180), among others, have put forward similar models . This cluster of theories is woven from many strands; we will try to tease these apart in order to find out precisely which processes may be involved in speciation by founder effect. By placing them in the context of other models , we will argue that, although founder effects may cause speciation under sufficiently stringent conditions, they are only one extreme of a continuous range of possibilities. Complete geographic isolation is unnecessary; absolute coadaptation between "closed" systems of alleles is unlikely; and divergence may be

Journal

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and SystematicsAnnual Reviews

Published: Nov 1, 1984

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