Foraging Strategies Among Living Primates

Foraging Strategies Among Living Primates Field studies conducted over the past 25 years have documented significant differences in diet, foraging patterns, and locomotor behavior in sympatric primate species (20,21, 25, 35, 37, 40, 42, 46, 48,51, 53, 66, 70, 71, 91, 92, 95, 97-99,107,114, 115, 119-121, 129, 141, 145, 172, 200, 201, 203, 205,206,211, 212, 224, 227, 233). Resource utilization is related in part to body size (weight) and its effect on the metabolic and nutritional requirements of individual species, as well as scaling factors associated with gut size, food passage rate, home range area, and the cost of locomotion (29, 30, 52, 85, 117, 125, 130, 131, 144, 190, 192, 208). These factors determine the profitability of specific food items to the primate consumer and exert a strong influence on dietary and foraging patterns. For example, the relatively high metabolic rates and limited gut volumes of most small-bodied primates necessitate a diet high in nutrient quality and available energy. For primates weighing less than 2000 g, ripe fruits, exudates, nectar, and insects are the primary components of the diet. Even among closely related taxa of similar size, individual species exhibit distinct dietary patterns. Sussman (207: 152) argues that despite an abundance of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Anthropology Annual Reviews

Foraging Strategies Among Living Primates

Annual Review of Anthropology, Volume 16 (1) – Oct 1, 1987

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0084-6570
eISSN
1545-4290
DOI
10.1146/annurev.an.16.100187.002011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Field studies conducted over the past 25 years have documented significant differences in diet, foraging patterns, and locomotor behavior in sympatric primate species (20,21, 25, 35, 37, 40, 42, 46, 48,51, 53, 66, 70, 71, 91, 92, 95, 97-99,107,114, 115, 119-121, 129, 141, 145, 172, 200, 201, 203, 205,206,211, 212, 224, 227, 233). Resource utilization is related in part to body size (weight) and its effect on the metabolic and nutritional requirements of individual species, as well as scaling factors associated with gut size, food passage rate, home range area, and the cost of locomotion (29, 30, 52, 85, 117, 125, 130, 131, 144, 190, 192, 208). These factors determine the profitability of specific food items to the primate consumer and exert a strong influence on dietary and foraging patterns. For example, the relatively high metabolic rates and limited gut volumes of most small-bodied primates necessitate a diet high in nutrient quality and available energy. For primates weighing less than 2000 g, ripe fruits, exudates, nectar, and insects are the primary components of the diet. Even among closely related taxa of similar size, individual species exhibit distinct dietary patterns. Sussman (207: 152) argues that despite an abundance of

Journal

Annual Review of AnthropologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Oct 1, 1987

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