Ferritin: Structure, Gene Regulation, and Cellular Function in Animals, Plants, and Microorganisms

Ferritin: Structure, Gene Regulation, and Cellular Function in Animals, Plants, and Microorganisms I t remaine1:h now -in the next place to discourse o f the mines o f yron. a mettal which wee may well say is both the best and the worst implement used now in the world . . . . (1) PERSPECTIVES The history of civilization shows a long dependence on iron, particularly after the availability of iron for armaments increased (1). The evolution of organ289 0066-4154/87/0701-0289$02.00 THEIL isms also shows a long dependence on iron, even after the availability was diminished by dioxygen in the atmosphere (2). Ferritin maintains iron in an available, soluble form for use, e.g. in oxygen transfer, electron transfer, nitrogen fixation, and DNA synthesis (ribonucleotide reduction). The solubil­ ity of iron probably became a problem ca 2.5 billion years ago when H20 began to be used as a source of hydrogen for photosynthesis (2). Dioxygen, the byproduct of such photosynthesis and probably the worst environmental pollutant of all time, created a dilemma for iron-dependent organisms: either move to environments devoid of dioxygen or accommodate to the low solubil­ ity of Fe(III) produced by dioxygen from Fe(II). [Fe(III) is ca 10-9 X less soluble than Fe(II) (3). At concentrations greater than 10-18 M, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Reviews

Ferritin: Structure, Gene Regulation, and Cellular Function in Animals, Plants, and Microorganisms

Annual Review of Biochemistry, Volume 56 (1) – Jul 1, 1987

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4154
eISSN
1545-4509
DOI
10.1146/annurev.bi.56.070187.001445
pmid
3304136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I t remaine1:h now -in the next place to discourse o f the mines o f yron. a mettal which wee may well say is both the best and the worst implement used now in the world . . . . (1) PERSPECTIVES The history of civilization shows a long dependence on iron, particularly after the availability of iron for armaments increased (1). The evolution of organ289 0066-4154/87/0701-0289$02.00 THEIL isms also shows a long dependence on iron, even after the availability was diminished by dioxygen in the atmosphere (2). Ferritin maintains iron in an available, soluble form for use, e.g. in oxygen transfer, electron transfer, nitrogen fixation, and DNA synthesis (ribonucleotide reduction). The solubil­ ity of iron probably became a problem ca 2.5 billion years ago when H20 began to be used as a source of hydrogen for photosynthesis (2). Dioxygen, the byproduct of such photosynthesis and probably the worst environmental pollutant of all time, created a dilemma for iron-dependent organisms: either move to environments devoid of dioxygen or accommodate to the low solubil­ ity of Fe(III) produced by dioxygen from Fe(II). [Fe(III) is ca 10-9 X less soluble than Fe(II) (3). At concentrations greater than 10-18 M,

Journal

Annual Review of BiochemistryAnnual Reviews

Published: Jul 1, 1987

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