Factors Affecting Mineral Nutrient Acquisition by Plants

Factors Affecting Mineral Nutrient Acquisition by Plants The word acquisition emphasizes that more is involved in getting inorganic nutrients into plants than ion transport across cell membranes. 0066-4294/85/0601 -0077$02.00 CLARKSON The present review is concerned with two interfaces; much of the subject matter relates to events occurring at OI very near the root/soil interface, and the review itself attempts to provide an interface between plant physiology and soil science. Even at the risk of having rocks thrown from both sides, I suggest that many of the intriguing processes that occur in the root/soil interface merit a more purposeful and integrated investigation, especially by plant physiolo­ gists, than they have received. From a vast amount of published work I have been very selective in choosing matters that raise interesting physiological questions. I have not dealt with dinitrogen fixation by nodule-forming organ­ isms or by free-living N-fixing microorganisms since these vigorous fields are frequently reviewed; neither have I attempted to detail the various influences of environment on nutrient acquisition. The discussion opens with results of mathematical modeling which suggest the relative importance of root prop­ erties in nutrient acquisition; the more important properties are then examined. It is widely known that many plants are unable to acquire http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Factors Affecting Mineral Nutrient Acquisition by Plants

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Abstract

The word acquisition emphasizes that more is involved in getting inorganic nutrients into plants than ion transport across cell membranes. 0066-4294/85/0601 -0077$02.00 CLARKSON The present review is concerned with two interfaces; much of the subject matter relates to events occurring at OI very near the root/soil interface, and the review itself attempts to provide an interface between plant physiology and soil science. Even at the risk of having rocks thrown from both sides, I suggest that many of the intriguing processes that occur in the root/soil interface merit a more purposeful and integrated investigation, especially by plant physiolo­ gists, than they have received. From a vast amount of published work I have been very selective in choosing matters that raise interesting physiological questions. I have not dealt with dinitrogen fixation by nodule-forming organ­ isms or by free-living N-fixing microorganisms since these vigorous fields are frequently reviewed; neither have I attempted to detail the various influences of environment on nutrient acquisition. The discussion opens with results of mathematical modeling which suggest the relative importance of root prop­ erties in nutrient acquisition; the more important properties are then examined. It is widely known that many plants are unable to acquire

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1985

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