Endogenous Opioid Peptides and Hypothalamo-Pituitary Function

Endogenous Opioid Peptides and Hypothalamo-Pituitary Function Since the isolation of the first endogenous opioid peptides over ten years ago their precursors, and their receptors have been characterized (46) research has expanded exponentially. Many different opioid peptides, (12, 68, 79). Physiological roles for opioids have been described in such diverse areas as nociception, behavior and psychiatry, appetite, stress and shock. Much interest has centered, particularly in man, on the role of opioids in neuroendocrine regulation, which is the subject of this review. As always, differences exist between man and other animals, e.g. the much-studied rat. For brevity this review will therefore concentrate on the human data, mentioning other species only if important differences exist or if no comparable data are available in man. Unless otherwise stated all effects appear to occur at the hypothalamic rather than pituitary level. For clarity we use the term peptides, and opioid to refer to endogenous opiate to refer to morphine-like alkaloids (45). OPIOID PEPTIDES AND RECEPTORS All opioids firmly established to exist in man derive from one of three precursor peptides, whose structure has been elucidated from DNA analysis pentapeptides met- and leu-enkephalin were the first isolated (79). The (46); they share the N-terminal sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe, which appears to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Physiology Annual Reviews

Endogenous Opioid Peptides and Hypothalamo-Pituitary Function

Annual Review of Physiology, Volume 48 (1) – Mar 1, 1986

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1986 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4278
eISSN
1545-1585
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ph.48.030186.002523
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since the isolation of the first endogenous opioid peptides over ten years ago their precursors, and their receptors have been characterized (46) research has expanded exponentially. Many different opioid peptides, (12, 68, 79). Physiological roles for opioids have been described in such diverse areas as nociception, behavior and psychiatry, appetite, stress and shock. Much interest has centered, particularly in man, on the role of opioids in neuroendocrine regulation, which is the subject of this review. As always, differences exist between man and other animals, e.g. the much-studied rat. For brevity this review will therefore concentrate on the human data, mentioning other species only if important differences exist or if no comparable data are available in man. Unless otherwise stated all effects appear to occur at the hypothalamic rather than pituitary level. For clarity we use the term peptides, and opioid to refer to endogenous opiate to refer to morphine-like alkaloids (45). OPIOID PEPTIDES AND RECEPTORS All opioids firmly established to exist in man derive from one of three precursor peptides, whose structure has been elucidated from DNA analysis pentapeptides met- and leu-enkephalin were the first isolated (79). The (46); they share the N-terminal sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe, which appears to

Journal

Annual Review of PhysiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 1, 1986

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