Cyanide-Resistant Respiration in Higher Plants

Cyanide-Resistant Respiration in Higher Plants Since the initial demonstration that the respiration of certain plant tissues is resistant to inhibitors of cytochrome oxidase (100), it has been shown that cyanide-resistant respiration is widespread in higher plants and microorganisms (see 40). The subject has been reviewed in the past (11, 16, 42, 44, 61) and recently a comprehensive review has appeared (40) which has to some extent limited the scope of the present one. Consequently no attempt is made here to survey the whole literature. Instead selected past work is evaluated in the light of more recent developments, and some new aspects of the possible physiological significance of cyanide-resistant respiration in higher plants are proposed and discussed. Cellular Localization of Cyanide-Resistant Respiration Following the initial observation by James & Elliott (46) that the respiration of mitochondria isolated from the spadix of Arum maculatum, a tissue with cyanide­ resistant respiration (45), is insensitive to cyanide, numerous reports have shown SOLOMOS that mitochondria of cyanide-resistant tissues are also resistant to cyanide (cf 40). There are some exceptions, however, potato tubers being the most notable. In the potato, cyanide stimulates respiration in intact tubers while strongly inhibiting respiration in mitochondria isolated therefrom (38, 76, 81). Evidence is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Cyanide-Resistant Respiration in Higher Plants

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 28 (1) – Jun 1, 1977

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1977 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
DOI
10.1146/annurev.pp.28.060177.001431
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since the initial demonstration that the respiration of certain plant tissues is resistant to inhibitors of cytochrome oxidase (100), it has been shown that cyanide-resistant respiration is widespread in higher plants and microorganisms (see 40). The subject has been reviewed in the past (11, 16, 42, 44, 61) and recently a comprehensive review has appeared (40) which has to some extent limited the scope of the present one. Consequently no attempt is made here to survey the whole literature. Instead selected past work is evaluated in the light of more recent developments, and some new aspects of the possible physiological significance of cyanide-resistant respiration in higher plants are proposed and discussed. Cellular Localization of Cyanide-Resistant Respiration Following the initial observation by James & Elliott (46) that the respiration of mitochondria isolated from the spadix of Arum maculatum, a tissue with cyanide­ resistant respiration (45), is insensitive to cyanide, numerous reports have shown SOLOMOS that mitochondria of cyanide-resistant tissues are also resistant to cyanide (cf 40). There are some exceptions, however, potato tubers being the most notable. In the potato, cyanide stimulates respiration in intact tubers while strongly inhibiting respiration in mitochondria isolated therefrom (38, 76, 81). Evidence is

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1977

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