Current Status of the Gene-For-Gene Concept

Current Status of the Gene-For-Gene Concept One of the most successful means of controlling plant diseases has been the development of varieties with major or vertical resistance genes. This type of resistance is easily manipulated in a breeding program and is efIec­ tive until strains of the pathogen to which it does not confer resistance be­ come established. Then, if another gene that conditions resistance to the new strains of the pathogen is available, this resistance gene may be incorporated into the variety by the plant breeder. In doing this, the breeder either con­ sciously or unconsciously is applying the principle of the gene-far-gene hypothesis. Plants resistant to races that are virulent on old varieties possess the new resistance gene. With the diseases of some crops, this process has becn repeated at relatively frequent intervals (4D, 42, 82). However, in some instances a single gene has conferred adequate resistance for many years 80,82). In plant diseases caused by living organisms, the same phenomena: in­ fection type in rusts, percent of infected plants in smuts of cereals, fleck or lesion in apple scab, are criteria of both the reaction of the host and the pathogenicity of the parasite. They indicate the relative resistance or sus­ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Phytopathology Annual Reviews

Current Status of the Gene-For-Gene Concept

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1971 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4286
eISSN
1545-2107
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.py.09.090171.001423
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the most successful means of controlling plant diseases has been the development of varieties with major or vertical resistance genes. This type of resistance is easily manipulated in a breeding program and is efIec­ tive until strains of the pathogen to which it does not confer resistance be­ come established. Then, if another gene that conditions resistance to the new strains of the pathogen is available, this resistance gene may be incorporated into the variety by the plant breeder. In doing this, the breeder either con­ sciously or unconsciously is applying the principle of the gene-far-gene hypothesis. Plants resistant to races that are virulent on old varieties possess the new resistance gene. With the diseases of some crops, this process has becn repeated at relatively frequent intervals (4D, 42, 82). However, in some instances a single gene has conferred adequate resistance for many years 80,82). In plant diseases caused by living organisms, the same phenomena: in­ fection type in rusts, percent of infected plants in smuts of cereals, fleck or lesion in apple scab, are criteria of both the reaction of the host and the pathogenicity of the parasite. They indicate the relative resistance or sus­

Journal

Annual Review of PhytopathologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Sep 1, 1971

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