Creativity, Intelligence, and Personality

Creativity, Intelligence, and Personality Divergent thinking; creativity in women; hemispheric specialization oppos­ ing right brain to left as the source of intuition, metaphor, and imagery; the contribution of altered states of consciousness to creative thinking; an or­ ganismic interpretation of the relationship of creativity to personality and intelligence; new methods of analysis of biographical material and a new emphasis on psychohistory; the relationship of thought disorder to original­ ity; the inheritance of intellectual and personal traits important to cre­ ativity; the enhancement of creativity by training; these have been the main themes emerging in research on creativity since the last major reviews of the field (Stein 1 968; Dellas & Gaier 1 970; Freeman, Butcher & Christie 1971; Gilchrist 1972). Much indeed has happened in the field of creativity research since 1950, when J. P. Guilford in his parting address as president of the American Psychological Association pointed out that up to that time only 1 86 out of 1 2 1 ,000 entries in Psychological Abstracts dealt with creative imagination. By 1956, when the first national research conference on creativity was organized by C. W. Taylor at the University of Utah (under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation), this number http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Psychology Annual Reviews

Creativity, Intelligence, and Personality

Annual Review of Psychology, Volume 32 (1) – Feb 1, 1981

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1981 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4308
eISSN
1545-2085
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ps.32.020181.002255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Divergent thinking; creativity in women; hemispheric specialization oppos­ ing right brain to left as the source of intuition, metaphor, and imagery; the contribution of altered states of consciousness to creative thinking; an or­ ganismic interpretation of the relationship of creativity to personality and intelligence; new methods of analysis of biographical material and a new emphasis on psychohistory; the relationship of thought disorder to original­ ity; the inheritance of intellectual and personal traits important to cre­ ativity; the enhancement of creativity by training; these have been the main themes emerging in research on creativity since the last major reviews of the field (Stein 1 968; Dellas & Gaier 1 970; Freeman, Butcher & Christie 1971; Gilchrist 1972). Much indeed has happened in the field of creativity research since 1950, when J. P. Guilford in his parting address as president of the American Psychological Association pointed out that up to that time only 1 86 out of 1 2 1 ,000 entries in Psychological Abstracts dealt with creative imagination. By 1956, when the first national research conference on creativity was organized by C. W. Taylor at the University of Utah (under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation), this number

Journal

Annual Review of PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1981

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