Comparative Photosynthesis of Sun and Shade Plants

Comparative Photosynthesis of Sun and Shade Plants INTRODUCfION It has been known for a long time that plants which occupy shaded habitats are incapable of high photosynthetic rates, but they perform efficiently at low light intensities. Plants that grow under high light intensities in their native habitats have a high capacity for photosynthesis at a saturating light intensity, but they show lower rates of net photosynthesis than shade plants at low light intensities (20,70). BOARDMAN Extreme shade species can survive at much lower light intensities than sun species. Differences in photosynthetic characteristics can also be induced by the light inten­ sity under which a particular species is grown. Leaves of sun species when grown under low light intensities show light saturation curves which bear resemblance to those of shade plants. Thus a classification of plants into sun and shade species cannot be made on the basis of light saturation curves or light compensation points alone. Plants are classified into sun and shade plants depending on their adaptability to a selected light intensity (6). This adaptability is inherited; it is determined by the genotype and results from genetic adaptation to the light environment prevailing in the native habitat. This review is concerned with the mechanisms underlying http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Comparative Photosynthesis of Sun and Shade Plants

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 28 (1) – Jun 1, 1977

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1977 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.pp.28.060177.002035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCfION It has been known for a long time that plants which occupy shaded habitats are incapable of high photosynthetic rates, but they perform efficiently at low light intensities. Plants that grow under high light intensities in their native habitats have a high capacity for photosynthesis at a saturating light intensity, but they show lower rates of net photosynthesis than shade plants at low light intensities (20,70). BOARDMAN Extreme shade species can survive at much lower light intensities than sun species. Differences in photosynthetic characteristics can also be induced by the light inten­ sity under which a particular species is grown. Leaves of sun species when grown under low light intensities show light saturation curves which bear resemblance to those of shade plants. Thus a classification of plants into sun and shade species cannot be made on the basis of light saturation curves or light compensation points alone. Plants are classified into sun and shade plants depending on their adaptability to a selected light intensity (6). This adaptability is inherited; it is determined by the genotype and results from genetic adaptation to the light environment prevailing in the native habitat. This review is concerned with the mechanisms underlying

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1977

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