Cell Adhesion Molecules in Neural Histogenesis

Cell Adhesion Molecules in Neural Histogenesis Aside from evolutionary change itself, there are three main sources of variabil­ ity in neural networks: the somatic developmental sequence, which is responsi­ ble for network formation and neuroanatomy; the chemical and structural variation at synapses (particularly that related to neurotransmitters and chan­ nels); and the electrical variation that depends both upon intrinsic cellular metabolism and external signals. These processes emerge in a clear-cut order of development. It is just as clear, however, that none of these processes is fully independent of the others, although their relative contributions vary in time. While much has been done to study neurotransmitters and electrical activity in the last three decades, only recently has it become possible to study the molecular bases of constancy and variation in network formation, fiber tract mapping, and the establishment of the earliest contacts of nerve and muscle. One of the key elements in this molecular analysis has been the development of a concerted series of assays (4, 12, 13, 32) that unequivocally establish criteria for the isolation and structural and functional characterization of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Prior to this approach, the evidence for the existence of such molecules was sparse and unconvincing, but since its http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Physiology Annual Reviews

Cell Adhesion Molecules in Neural Histogenesis

Annual Review of Physiology, Volume 48 (1) – Mar 1, 1986

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1986 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4278
eISSN
1545-1585
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ph.48.030186.002221
pmid
3518619
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aside from evolutionary change itself, there are three main sources of variabil­ ity in neural networks: the somatic developmental sequence, which is responsi­ ble for network formation and neuroanatomy; the chemical and structural variation at synapses (particularly that related to neurotransmitters and chan­ nels); and the electrical variation that depends both upon intrinsic cellular metabolism and external signals. These processes emerge in a clear-cut order of development. It is just as clear, however, that none of these processes is fully independent of the others, although their relative contributions vary in time. While much has been done to study neurotransmitters and electrical activity in the last three decades, only recently has it become possible to study the molecular bases of constancy and variation in network formation, fiber tract mapping, and the establishment of the earliest contacts of nerve and muscle. One of the key elements in this molecular analysis has been the development of a concerted series of assays (4, 12, 13, 32) that unequivocally establish criteria for the isolation and structural and functional characterization of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Prior to this approach, the evidence for the existence of such molecules was sparse and unconvincing, but since its

Journal

Annual Review of PhysiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 1, 1986

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