Calcium Regulation in Plant Cells and its Role in Signaling

Calcium Regulation in Plant Cells and its Role in Signaling Calcium plays a key role in plant growth and development because changes in cellular Ca2+, acting through Ca2+-modulated proteins and their targets, regu­ late an astonishing variety of cellular processes. The regulatory actions of Ca2+ range from control of ion transport to gene expression and are possible be­ cause of a homeostatic system that regulates Ca2+ levels. The development of this homeostatic system is evolutionarily ancient and probably reflects a bio­ chemical necessity of maintaining low levels of Ca2+ in the phosphate-rich environment of the cytosol (101). Evolutionary invention, however, has turned this requirement into a complex system for regulating cellular function through controlled fluctuations in Ca2+ levels. Progress in understanding the Ca2+ homeostat and its significance for signaling in plant cells has been accelerated by direct measurements of ion channel activities and Ca2+ levels in living cells, and by molecular characterization of Ca2+ transport proteins. The convergence of these three kinds of information has shown that the cellular machinery for establishing Ca2+ homeostasis in plants, although used to di­ verse ends, is remarkably similar to that found in other eukaryotic cells. This review considers what has been learned recently about the components of the Ca2+ homeostat in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Plant Biology Annual Reviews

Calcium Regulation in Plant Cells and its Role in Signaling

Annual Review of Plant Biology, Volume 46 (1) – Jun 1, 1995

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1995 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
1040-2519
DOI
10.1146/annurev.pp.46.060195.000523
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Calcium plays a key role in plant growth and development because changes in cellular Ca2+, acting through Ca2+-modulated proteins and their targets, regu­ late an astonishing variety of cellular processes. The regulatory actions of Ca2+ range from control of ion transport to gene expression and are possible be­ cause of a homeostatic system that regulates Ca2+ levels. The development of this homeostatic system is evolutionarily ancient and probably reflects a bio­ chemical necessity of maintaining low levels of Ca2+ in the phosphate-rich environment of the cytosol (101). Evolutionary invention, however, has turned this requirement into a complex system for regulating cellular function through controlled fluctuations in Ca2+ levels. Progress in understanding the Ca2+ homeostat and its significance for signaling in plant cells has been accelerated by direct measurements of ion channel activities and Ca2+ levels in living cells, and by molecular characterization of Ca2+ transport proteins. The convergence of these three kinds of information has shown that the cellular machinery for establishing Ca2+ homeostasis in plants, although used to di­ verse ends, is remarkably similar to that found in other eukaryotic cells. This review considers what has been learned recently about the components of the Ca2+ homeostat in

Journal

Annual Review of Plant BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jun 1, 1995

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