An Evolutionary and Applied Perspective of Insect Biotypes

An Evolutionary and Applied Perspective of Insect Biotypes S. R. Diehl} and G. L. Bush Departments of Entomology and Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 Benjamin Walsh (174) was probably the first to seriously consider the status of insects that morphologically resemble one another so closely that they can only be distinguished on the basis of subtle biological traits such as preference for or the ability to survive on different hosts. Most of Walsh's "phytophagic varieties" now fall under the rubric "biotype," a term employed primarily by applied biologists to distinguish populations of insects and other organisms whose differences are due to a very wide range of underlying causes. The significance of biotypes for both evolutionary and applied fields is not general­ ly appreciated. Our objective is to integrate the current concepts used by evolutionary biologists to describe various patterns and levels of differentiation in insects with the views of the applied biologist. A classification system of insect biotypes, based on the mechanisms underlying their differentiation, is outlined below. We also consider the significance of biotypes in adaptation, speciation, and pest management. A MATTER OF TERMINOLOGY Biotypes are most commonly entomophagous or phytophagous parasites or parasitoids distinguished by survival and development on a particular http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Entomology Annual Reviews

An Evolutionary and Applied Perspective of Insect Biotypes

Annual Review of Entomology, Volume 29 (1) – Jan 1, 1984

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1984 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4170
eISSN
1545-4487
DOI
10.1146/annurev.en.29.010184.002351
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

S. R. Diehl} and G. L. Bush Departments of Entomology and Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 Benjamin Walsh (174) was probably the first to seriously consider the status of insects that morphologically resemble one another so closely that they can only be distinguished on the basis of subtle biological traits such as preference for or the ability to survive on different hosts. Most of Walsh's "phytophagic varieties" now fall under the rubric "biotype," a term employed primarily by applied biologists to distinguish populations of insects and other organisms whose differences are due to a very wide range of underlying causes. The significance of biotypes for both evolutionary and applied fields is not general­ ly appreciated. Our objective is to integrate the current concepts used by evolutionary biologists to describe various patterns and levels of differentiation in insects with the views of the applied biologist. A classification system of insect biotypes, based on the mechanisms underlying their differentiation, is outlined below. We also consider the significance of biotypes in adaptation, speciation, and pest management. A MATTER OF TERMINOLOGY Biotypes are most commonly entomophagous or phytophagous parasites or parasitoids distinguished by survival and development on a particular

Journal

Annual Review of EntomologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Jan 1, 1984

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