Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factors

Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factors Three different lines of research and three entirely different observations have led to the discovery of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). In 1957, Salmon & Daughaday carried out an important experiment (44). They observed that serum stimulated the incorporation of 35S into incubated cartilage. Serum of hypophysectomized rats was devoid of this sulfation activity. It could not be reconstituted by addition of growth hormone to the incubation medium but reappeared after administration of growth hormone to hypophysectomized rats (44). These observations led Daughaday to postulate that growth hormone itself does not stimulate growth processes in vitro and in vivo, but rather induces the formation of factors that mediate the message of growth hormone. These factors-first called sulfation factors, later soma­ tomedins-Iead to sulfation of cartilage in vitro, which reflects growth in vivo. As we shall see, this hypothesis has been proven to be valid. Most cultured cells need serum to grow. Several growth factors in serum are responsible for growth-promoting effects, an aspect that will be discussed below in more detail. In 1972, Pierson & Temin extracted factors from serum, which they called multiplication-stimulating activity (MSA) (37). These fac­ tors had molecular weights below 10,000. When added to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Physiology Annual Reviews

Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factors

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1985 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4278
eISSN
1545-1585
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev.ph.47.030185.002303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Three different lines of research and three entirely different observations have led to the discovery of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). In 1957, Salmon & Daughaday carried out an important experiment (44). They observed that serum stimulated the incorporation of 35S into incubated cartilage. Serum of hypophysectomized rats was devoid of this sulfation activity. It could not be reconstituted by addition of growth hormone to the incubation medium but reappeared after administration of growth hormone to hypophysectomized rats (44). These observations led Daughaday to postulate that growth hormone itself does not stimulate growth processes in vitro and in vivo, but rather induces the formation of factors that mediate the message of growth hormone. These factors-first called sulfation factors, later soma­ tomedins-Iead to sulfation of cartilage in vitro, which reflects growth in vivo. As we shall see, this hypothesis has been proven to be valid. Most cultured cells need serum to grow. Several growth factors in serum are responsible for growth-promoting effects, an aspect that will be discussed below in more detail. In 1972, Pierson & Temin extracted factors from serum, which they called multiplication-stimulating activity (MSA) (37). These fac­ tors had molecular weights below 10,000. When added to

Journal

Annual Review of PhysiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 1, 1985

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