Winter Wind Regimes over Israel Using Self-Organizing Maps

Winter Wind Regimes over Israel Using Self-Organizing Maps AbstractThe aim of this study is to objectively define and automatically reconstruct surface wind regimes over Israel. Unlike other previous studies that subjectively examined case studies or applied the semiobjective synoptic classification (SOC), this study shows the ability of the method of self-organizing maps (SOM) to directly define well-known wind regimes at the synoptic hours (0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC) during the winter. This ability sets the groundwork for future automatic climatological analysis and applications. The investigation is performed by analyzing surface wind measurements from 53 Israel Meteorological Service stations. The relation between the synoptic variables and the wind regimes is revealed from the averages of ECMWF interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim) variables at each SOM wind regime. The inspection of wind regimes and their average pressure anomalies has shown that wind regimes relate to the gradient of the pressure anomalies rather than to the specific isobaric pattern. Two main wind regimes—strong western and strong eastern—are well known over this region. During daytime, SOM classification identifies these two regimes while SOC reveals only strong western regimes since SOC considers depth of the pressure gradients only in the case of low pressure centers. In accordance with previous studies, two main groups—winter low and high pressure centers and/or Red Sea troughs—are related to the strong westerly or easterly wind regimes with low diurnal variability and high daily persistence. Regimes under weak pressure gradients have higher diurnal variability, relatively lower steadiness, and weaker speed. Their daily persistence is not necessarily low. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology American Meteorological Society

Winter Wind Regimes over Israel Using Self-Organizing Maps

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Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1558-8432
D.O.I.
10.1175/JAMC-D-16-0381.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe aim of this study is to objectively define and automatically reconstruct surface wind regimes over Israel. Unlike other previous studies that subjectively examined case studies or applied the semiobjective synoptic classification (SOC), this study shows the ability of the method of self-organizing maps (SOM) to directly define well-known wind regimes at the synoptic hours (0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC) during the winter. This ability sets the groundwork for future automatic climatological analysis and applications. The investigation is performed by analyzing surface wind measurements from 53 Israel Meteorological Service stations. The relation between the synoptic variables and the wind regimes is revealed from the averages of ECMWF interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim) variables at each SOM wind regime. The inspection of wind regimes and their average pressure anomalies has shown that wind regimes relate to the gradient of the pressure anomalies rather than to the specific isobaric pattern. Two main wind regimes—strong western and strong eastern—are well known over this region. During daytime, SOM classification identifies these two regimes while SOC reveals only strong western regimes since SOC considers depth of the pressure gradients only in the case of low pressure centers. In accordance with previous studies, two main groups—winter low and high pressure centers and/or Red Sea troughs—are related to the strong westerly or easterly wind regimes with low diurnal variability and high daily persistence. Regimes under weak pressure gradients have higher diurnal variability, relatively lower steadiness, and weaker speed. Their daily persistence is not necessarily low.

Journal

Journal of Applied Meteorology and ClimatologyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 6, 2017

References

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