Why Mie

Why Mie This article demonstrates an innovative method for the observation of vertical air motion and raindrop size distribution in precipitation using a 94-GHz Doppler radar. The method is particularly appealing since it is based on fundamental physicsthe scattering of microwave radiation by large particles (Mie scattering). The technique was originally proposed in 1988 by Dr. Roger Lhermitte, who ironically pioneered the development of 94-GHz Doppler radars for the study of nonprecipitating clouds. Since then, no real effort for the evaluation and demonstration of the technique was undertaken. In this article, observations from stratiform rain are presented to illustrate the potential and accuracy of the method. The retrievals from this technique provide vertical air motion to an accuracy of 510 cm s1. Despite attenuation, the Doppler velocity measurements remain unbiased and the data revealed high-resolution kinematical and microphysical structures within the stratiform precipitation for the first time. This article will hopefully expose the potential of this technique to the meteorological community and will serve as another example of the visionary contributions that Dr. Lhermitte has made to radar meteorology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society American Meteorological Society

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/why-mie-0UbkYK8MXH
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1520-0477
D.O.I.
10.1175/BAMS-83-10-1471
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article demonstrates an innovative method for the observation of vertical air motion and raindrop size distribution in precipitation using a 94-GHz Doppler radar. The method is particularly appealing since it is based on fundamental physicsthe scattering of microwave radiation by large particles (Mie scattering). The technique was originally proposed in 1988 by Dr. Roger Lhermitte, who ironically pioneered the development of 94-GHz Doppler radars for the study of nonprecipitating clouds. Since then, no real effort for the evaluation and demonstration of the technique was undertaken. In this article, observations from stratiform rain are presented to illustrate the potential and accuracy of the method. The retrievals from this technique provide vertical air motion to an accuracy of 510 cm s1. Despite attenuation, the Doppler velocity measurements remain unbiased and the data revealed high-resolution kinematical and microphysical structures within the stratiform precipitation for the first time. This article will hopefully expose the potential of this technique to the meteorological community and will serve as another example of the visionary contributions that Dr. Lhermitte has made to radar meteorology.

Journal

Bulletin of the American Meteorological SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Oct 31, 2002

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off