Use of Observational Weather Data and Forecasts in Emergency Management: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

Use of Observational Weather Data and Forecasts in Emergency Management: An Application of the... AbstractMany factors affect the extent to which forecasts inform emergency responses. In a survey based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), 207 U.S. emergency managers (EMs) were asked about 1) their past and intended future use of short-term weather forecasts and recorded weather data, 2) the perceived limitations and 3a) their attitude toward the usefulness of such weather information, 3b) their attitude toward their job and toward uncertainty, 4) perceived social norms, and 5) self-assessed numeracy. Work experience was found to be the best predictor of whether an emergency manager relied on recorded weather data and short-term weather forecasts in the past or intends to do so in the future. Among TPB variables, mainly social expectations and data attitude drive the reliance on recorded weather data and short-term forecasts. The EMs’ perception of the weather information’s limitations is related to their perceptions of what their social surroundings think. In sum, this article sheds light on when and why EMs use weather data and forecasts and how training can be improved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Weather, Climate, and Society American Meteorological Society

Use of Observational Weather Data and Forecasts in Emergency Management: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ams/use-of-observational-weather-data-and-forecasts-in-emergency-2jcGpAlKi8
Publisher
American Meteorological Society
Copyright
Copyright © American Meteorological Society
ISSN
1948-8335
D.O.I.
10.1175/WCAS-D-16-0088.1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractMany factors affect the extent to which forecasts inform emergency responses. In a survey based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), 207 U.S. emergency managers (EMs) were asked about 1) their past and intended future use of short-term weather forecasts and recorded weather data, 2) the perceived limitations and 3a) their attitude toward the usefulness of such weather information, 3b) their attitude toward their job and toward uncertainty, 4) perceived social norms, and 5) self-assessed numeracy. Work experience was found to be the best predictor of whether an emergency manager relied on recorded weather data and short-term weather forecasts in the past or intends to do so in the future. Among TPB variables, mainly social expectations and data attitude drive the reliance on recorded weather data and short-term forecasts. The EMs’ perception of the weather information’s limitations is related to their perceptions of what their social surroundings think. In sum, this article sheds light on when and why EMs use weather data and forecasts and how training can be improved.

Journal

Weather, Climate, and SocietyAmerican Meteorological Society

Published: Apr 26, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off